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I am new to css and this has me stumped.

  1. How do I get the parent div to always contain its children? As soon as I start using floats for alignment the parent stops containing children.
  2. I actually do not want to float things. I want to align them. How do we do alignments and margins in css and not yet hardcode all dimensions?
  3. Can someone kindly profive the css for this? Lets assume for the sake of this example that the total width is 960px and all margins are 15px;
share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "aligning" the elements? –  You Jun 22 '12 at 9:29
    
float does not explain the green element. I don't want it 'float' to the bottom(which makes no sense) I want it to 'sink' to the bottom. So basically I want it aligned to the bottom. –  NVM Jun 22 '12 at 9:35
    
In that case, I'd say float the purple and blue elements, clear the green one (i.e. solution #1 in @Konrads answer). –  You Jun 22 '12 at 9:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Let's see a clear and flexible version:

#container { background: gray; overflow: hidden; padding: 15px; }
#left { background: purple; width: 200px; float: left; margin: 0 15px 15px 0; } 
#content { background: blue; overflow: hidden; margin: 0 0 15px 0 } 
#footer { background: green; height: 50px; clear: left; } 

Even the width and height you see set is unnecessary, boxes can adjust to their content when omitted, I just added them for demo purposes.

share|improve this answer
    
The last link is brilliant. –  NVM Jun 22 '12 at 10:10
    
@NVM Most of his articles are brilliant. –  kapa Jun 22 '12 at 12:02

Three alternatives:

  1. Set clear: both on the green element.
  2. Set overflow: hidden on the parent container.
  3. Use clearfix on the parent container.
share|improve this answer
2  
In this case, we'd get a free clearfix from the green element (by applying clear: both to it). –  You Jun 22 '12 at 9:28
    
@You Good point. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 22 '12 at 9:30
    
#1 is how I'd go –  Greg B Jun 22 '12 at 9:39
    
+1 Konrad i am agree with your answers..... –  Shailender Arora Jun 22 '12 at 9:40

Check this out: http://jsfiddle.net/kMQbt/

Html:

<div id="parent">
 <div id="purple">
     purple
 </div>
 <div id="blue">
     blue
 </div>
 <div id="green">
     green
 </div>
</div>​

Css:

#parent{
 width: 960px;
 background-color: grey;    
 float:none;
 padding-bottom: 15px;
}

#purple{
 width: 200px;
 height: 200px;
 float:left;   
 margin-top: 15px;
 margin-left: 15px;
 background-color: purple;
}
#green{
 width: 930px;
 height: 200px;
 background-color: green;  
 clear: both;
 margin-left: 15px;
}

#blue{
 width: 715px;
 float:left;
 height: 300px;
 margin: 15px;
 background-color: blue;
}

share|improve this answer
    
Not quite flexible, you have to specify the dimensions not to break the floats. –  kapa Jun 22 '12 at 9:49
    
you are right, i upvoted your solution –  Cristi Pufu Jun 22 '12 at 9:56

Use clearfix and assign the class to your container is one of the way to fix your problem.

/* let's clear some floats */
.clearfix:before, .clearfix:after { content: "\0020"; display: block; height: 0; overflow: hidden; }  
.clearfix:after { clear: both; }  
.clearfix { zoom: 1; }
share|improve this answer
<div id="container">
<div id="main">
<div id="main_left"></div>
<div id="main_right"></div>
</div>
<div id="last"></div>
</div>

css

#container
{
width:xx;
height:xx;
background:
}
#main
{
width:xx;
height:xx;
}
#main_left{
float:left;
width:xx;
height:xx;
}
#main_right
{
float:right
width:xx;
height:xx;
}
#last
{
clear:both;
width:xx;
height:xx;
}
share|improve this answer

demo http://jsfiddle.net/yTUU6/

HTML

<div id="contaner">
    <div id="top_left">
        left box
    </div>
    <div id="top_right">
        right box<br />
        height will be changed <br />
        <br /><br /> <br /><br />         <br /><br /> <br /><br />       <br /><br /> <br /><br />
    </div>
    <div class="clear"></div>
    <div id="bottom"></div>
</div>

CSS

#contaner{
    width: 100%;
    height: 400px;
    background: #EEEEEE;
}
#top_left{
    width: 30%;
    border:solid 1px;
    height: 200px;    
    float:left;
}
#top_right{
    width:69%;
    float:left;
    border:solid 1px red;
}
.clear{
    clear: both;
}
#bottom{
    height: 100px;
    border: solid 1px green;
}
share|improve this answer

The classic way (how i learned to do it) using a clearer element in between

CSS

.clearer{
    clear:both;
}
#parent{
    width:500px;
    background-color:#343434;
    padding:10px;
    color:#fff;
}

#box{
    width:50px;
    height:50px;
    margin:10px;
    float:left;
    background-color:#545454;
}

#variable{
    width:400px;
    float:left;
}

#footer{
    height:40px;
    margin-top:30px;
    background-color:#646464;
}

HTML

<div id="parent">
    <div id="box"></div>
    <div id="variable">
    </div>
    <div class="clearer"></div>
    <div id="footer"></div>
</div>

An example here

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
1  
Pointless. Apply clear: both to #footer instead. –  You Jun 22 '12 at 9:40

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