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I've spent quite a few hours trying to solve the problem described below:

I've got a DataGrid defined in my MVVM WPF application, the stripped down XAML code looks like this:

<DataGrid AutoGenerateColumns="False" Name="dgdSomeDataGrid" SelectedItem="{Binding SelectedSomeItem, Mode=TwoWay}" ItemsSource="{Binding SomeItemCollection}">
    <DataGrid.Columns>
        <DataGridTextColumn Binding="{Binding Path=Id}" Header="ID" />
        <DataGridTextColumn Header="Titel" Binding="{Binding Path=Title}" />
        <DataGridTextColumn Header="Status" Binding="{Binding Path=State}" />
    </DataGrid.Columns>
</DataGrid>

In my associated ViewModel I've got a corresponding property like:

public WorkItemForUi SelectedSomeItem
{
    get
    {
        return SomeObject.SelectedSomeItem;
    }
    set
    {
        SomeObject.SelectedSomeItem = value;
        OnPropertyChanged( "SelectedSomeItem" );
    }
}

In my controller I've got the following:

private void MainWindowViewModelPropertyChanged( object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e )
{
    if ( e.PropertyName == "SelectedSomeItem" )
    {
        UpdateSelectedSomeItem();
    }
}

What I generally want to do is to retrieve the selected item from the DataGrid, get some more information about the item from an external data store (a TFS in this case) and show that extra information in a TextBox.

All of this already works as expected, but the problem is that the MainWindowViewModelPropertyChanged method is called twice, not once.

It may be the case that it is by design for the SelectedItem property being set to happen twice, but I'm not quite sure as a lot of information I found is a bit contradictory (and also sometimes not quite clear whether Windows Forms or WPF are meant).

I've seen some suggestions where a SelectionChanged event handler is defined for the DataGrid and an IsSelected property is used, but as far as I know this shouldn't be necessary due to my data binding.

Update As part of the MainWindowController there is an Initialize method that references the MainWindowViewModelPropertyChanged handler.

    public void Initialize( string tfsProjectCollection )
    {
        InitializeCommands();
        InitializeViewModel();
        AddWeakEventListener( m_MainWindowViewModel, MainWindowViewModelPropertyChanged );
    }

Any ideas what might be the cause of my problem?

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MainWindowViewModelPropertyChanged() is called every time when any property is changed that is used for the INotifyPropertyChanged implementation in the ViewModel. Is it e.PropertyName == "SelectedSomeItem" in both calls or does e.PropertyName have different values? –  Jens H Jun 22 '12 at 9:44
    
Have you tried e.Handled = true after UpdateSelectedSomeItem(); in case it's the same event coming through twice for some reason? –  Scroog1 Jun 22 '12 at 9:45
    
@JensH: It's the same for both ("SelectedSomeItem"). –  Gorgsenegger Jun 22 '12 at 9:49
    
@Scroog1: In the MainWindowViewModelPropertyChanged method "e" is of type "PropertyChangedEventArgs" and doesn't have a "Handled" property...? –  Gorgsenegger Jun 22 '12 at 9:52
    
Is SelectedSomeItem.set also called twice? Does it help to add the condition if (SomeObject.SelectedSomeItem != value) { ... } (because that is the typical pattern for INotifyPropertyChanged)? –  user128300 Jun 22 '12 at 9:58

2 Answers 2

Does your SomeObject.SelectedSomeItem setter raise also OnPropertyChanged( "SelectedSomeItem" );? what is the type of SomeObject? why does SomeObject also need the SelectedSomeItem Property?

Please also post some code where you subscribe the MainWindowViewModelPropertyChanged.

I never had problem with the selecteditem behavior, but to be fair I did not need to subscribe to INotifyPropertyChanged to get this information. and i think you did not need that too. there are better way to communicate between viewmodels

EDIT: this works, but i dont know what SomeObject is in your code.

private WorkItemForUi _selected;
public WorkItemForUi SelectedSomeItem
{
get
{
    return this._selectedSomeItem;
}
set
{
    this._selectedSomeItem = value;
    OnPropertyChanged( "SelectedSomeItem" );
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
SomeObject is a hand-crafted object containing properties that are needed for showing on the UI. Maybe I went in the wrong direction, but I need one collection of items for my DataGrid and one item of the type of the other items in the collection which is bound to be the SelectedItem. For this SelectedItem I retrieve additional data that I don't want to retrieve in advance for all the items in my collection that is bound to the DataGrid. –  Gorgsenegger Jun 22 '12 at 12:10
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Alright, after spending some more time on this we found out that the problem was in the ApplicationController class.

The constructor called the Initialize method in that class, and the Run method in the same class also called this method.

Within the Initialize method there was a call to the main window's view model `Initialize´ method in which an event listener was added:

[...]
AddWeakEventListener( m_MainWindowViewModel, MainWindowViewModelPropertyChanged );
[...]

Removing the call to the Initialize method from the constructor of the ApplicationController class solved the problem.

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