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This morning, I find myself writing something like:

if (a == b == c):
  # do something

And was surprised that it gave me the expected result.

I thought it would behave as:

if ((a == b) == c):
  # do something

But it obviously didn't. It seems Python is treating the first statement differently from the second, which is nice but I couldn't find any documentation or explanation regarding this.

I tested and got this:

In [1]: 2 == 2 == 2
Out[1]: True

In [2]: (2 == 2) == 2
Out[2]: False

Would someone care to explain me what are the rules regarding such "chaining" of == (or !=) ?

Thank you very much.

share|improve this question
3  
Formally, if a, b, c, ..., y, z are expressions and op1, op2, ..., opN are comparison operators, then a op1 b op2 c ... y opN z is equivalent to a op1 b and b op2 c and ... y opN z, except that each expression is evaluated at most once. @ docs.python.org/reference/expressions.html – georg Jun 22 '12 at 9:46
2  
Neat, eh? You can also do a < b < c and such. – Thomas Jun 22 '12 at 9:48
    
Not that I care much, but may the downvoter explain why he downvoted ? – ereOn Jun 26 '12 at 7:01
up vote 24 down vote accepted

This works with all comparison operators - eg, you can also do:

>>> 4 < 5 < 6
True
>>> 4 < 5 !=2
True

In general, according to the documentation, a op1 b op2 c where op1 and op2 are any of: <, >, !=, ==, <=, >=, is , is not, in or not in will give the same result as:

a op1 b and b op2 c

The docs also say that this can work with arbitrarily many comparisons, so:

>>> 5 != '5' != 'five' != (3+2)
True

Which can be a slightly confusing result sometimes since it seems to say 5 != (3+2) - each operand is only compared with the ones immediately adjacent to it, rather than doing all possible combinations (which mightn't be clear from examples using only ==, since it won't affect the answer if everything defines __eq__ sanely).

share|improve this answer
    
Also works for in and not in, e.g. 4 in [4] in [[4]] (not that I'm recommending this usage...) – interjay Jun 22 '12 at 9:50
    
@interjay indeed and I was actually editing those into my answer when your comment appeared. GMTA. :-) – lvc Jun 22 '12 at 9:52
1  
Thank you very much for the explanations. My love for this language grows day after day ! ;) – ereOn Jun 22 '12 at 11:39
    
@interjay However, the next logical extension, 4 and 5 in [4, 5], does not work as expected. That's a false positive, as shown here: 6 and 5 in [4, 5] == True. – Izkata Jun 22 '12 at 14:24
    
The lack of examples using chained != is probably because it's a strange thing to do with a non-transitive operator. If you really do want a != b != c != d to perform all possible checks, write something like if len({a, b, c, d}) == 4:. – dan04 Jun 22 '12 at 14:49

As far as I know the example you point out isn't chaining.

2 == 2 == 2 is like (2 == 2) and ( 2 == 2) which turns out to be True and True

while

(2 == 2) == 2 is like (True) == 2

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