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I have 3 tables which need to be linked in an SQL statement (I'm using PHP - MySQL if it helps). I need to extract all orders where the vendor field from the third table equals '3', as below:

orders   -  orders_items - items

order_id -> order_id
            item_id     -> id
                           vendor = '3'

There are many ways to do this I believe with various WHERE and JOINS but I'm asking for the most efficient methods in comparison to my method below:

SELECT
    orders.order_id
FROM
    items, orders
INNER JOIN
    orders_items
ON
    orders.order_id = orders_items.order_id
WHERE
    orders_items.item_id = items.id
AND
    items.vendor = '3'
GROUP BY
    orders.order_id
share|improve this question
    
I think what you have wrote is correct. You can join tables using JOIN statement and also in where statement.You have used both in the single statement (and both are same with different syntax) –  Sudhakar B Jun 22 '12 at 10:21

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using , notation is not universally considered bad practice, but I think it's quite a minority now that agree with it. Even Oracle (whose users seems to be the most vocal supporters of that syntax) recommend to not use it.

But I don't know anyone who would support mixing , and ANSI-92's JOIN syntax. It's just asking for trouble.

SELECT
  orders.order_id
FROM 
  orders
INNER JOIN
  orders_items
    ON orders.order_id = orders_items.order_id
INNER JOIN
  items
    ON orders_items.item_id = items.id
WHERE
  items.vendor = '3'
GROUP BY
  orders.order_id

The SQL Optimiser doesn't execute that exactly as you specified it. SQL is just a expression from which the SQL Optimiser derives a plan to give a result that fits. By writing it as above the optimiser will find what it sees as the best order to filter, join, sort, etc, and which are the best indexes, etc to use to do those things.


EDIT

I've noticed people supporting DISTINCT over GROUP BY.

While DISTINCT is slightly shorter, it is not any quicker, and does place restrictions on you. You can't later add COUNT(*) for example, but with GROUP BY you can.

In short, GROUP BY can do anything DISTINCT can, but that's not true the other way around. I only use DISTINCT in very trivial pieces of code so I can get a shole query on one line. Even then I often later regret it a little as the code develops and I need to rever to GROUP BY.

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Many thanks, a second inner join is the way I will go in this case –  Chris Crawshaw Jun 22 '12 at 11:36
select o.order_id from orders o inner join orders_items oi on o.order_id = oi.item_id inner join items i on oi.item_id = i.id where i.vendor='3';

Many ways to do the same like joins, sub query, in clause. Depends on the need like terms of time or terms of memory which will best to use also major dependance on the INDEX columns of table and amount of data join table having.

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You don't need the GROUP BY, just make a DISTINCT if you need to remove duplicates:

SELECT DISTINCT o.order_id
FROM orders o
INNER JOIN orders_items oi ON oi.order_id = o.order_id
INNER JOIN items i ON i.id = oi.items_id
where i.vendor = '3'

And also, use INNER JOIN on all tables :)

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This is efficient and will work too::

SELECT
   DISTINCT(orders.order_id)
FROM
    items

INNER JOIN orders_items on (items.id=orders_items.item_id )
inner join orders on (orders.order_id=order_items.order_id)
WHERE
items.vendor = '3'
share|improve this answer
SELECT
   orders.order_id
FROM
   orders o
      INNER JOIN orders_items oi ON o.order_id = oi.order_id
      INNER JOIN items i ON oi.item_id = i.item_id
WHERE
   i.vendor = 3

The table1, table2 syntax isn't something that I've used, but I imagine listing the tables as joins is more efficient as that seems to be the most accepted way.

Also, you don't need to put speech marks on the vendor criteria if the field is an integer.

share|improve this answer
SELECT O.order_id AS Id
FROM orders O
INNER JOIN orders_items OI
    ON O.order_id = OI.order_id
INNER JOIN items I
    ON OI.item_id = I.id
WHERE I.vendor = '3'
GROUP BY O.order_id
share|improve this answer
    
That's not true. The optimiser will also factor the WHERE clause into the join and it will behave just like an inner join. It's just different syntax. (A syntax I dislike, but not one that performs inherently wose in this case.) –  MatBailie Jun 22 '12 at 10:37
    
@Dems Noted and removed. –  Ryan Thomas Jun 22 '12 at 11:05

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