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struct X;

struct Y {
  void f(X*);
};

struct X { //definition
private:
  int i;
public:
  friend void Y::f(X*);
  <SNIP'd>
};

"struct Y has a member function f() that will modify an object of type X. This is a bit of a conundrum because the C++ compiler requires you to declare everything before you can refer to it, so struct Y must be declared before its member Y::f(X*) can be declared as a friend in struct X. But for Y::f(X*) to be declared struct X must be declared first!

Here's the solution. Notice that Y::f(X*) takes the address of an X object. This is critical because the compiler always knows how to pass an address, which is of a fixed size regardless of the object being passed, even if it doesn't have full information about the size of the type."

So here we have:

struct X; struct Y { ... }; struct X { ... };

My question is this:

  1. Why does the compiler insist that X be declared incompletely as: struct X;??

    After all, as the author notes: "compiler always knows how to pass an address which is of a fixed size." This is just a declaration that tells the compiler that X is a struct and soon to follow, so why is the compiler so insistent that you type out the letters: struct X; after all I'm not using X per se?? There's no assembly language code being generated at that point. and when it reads the X* surely it can tell that it's an address(pointer).. why is: struct X; needed?

    The whole point of declaring functions is for type checking before actual usage. So if I do:

     int foo(void); foo(30); 
    

    and the compiler will howl. But in the above, if I don't say: struct X; what difference does it make? Is he just checking my spelling of X (the function-name)?

  2. Why doesn't reversing the placement of struct Y and X work? Like so:
    struct Y; struct X { ... }; struct Y { ... };
    I get:

    error: invalid use of incomplete type 'struct main()::Y'

    Obviously, the compiler isn't satisfied with my incomplete type specification for Y (struct Y;). But what precious little nugget of info is missing?? After all struct Y; should tell the compiler that Y is soon to follow (same as doing what we were doing in Q1: struct X; struct Y {}; struct X{}; )

  3. Why does the author refer to struct X as a definition? If i do: struct X { ... }; this is surely a declaration? And when I instantiate the structure like so: X foo; then it's a definition? Correct?

  4. How do I do this:

    struct X {
      friend void Y::f(X*);
      void f(Y*);
    };
    
    struct Y {
      friend void X::f(Y*);
      void f(X*);
    };
    
share|improve this question
4  
Whenever you start thinking about C++ semantics in terms of assembly, you're doing it wrong. – Cat Plus Plus Jun 22 '12 at 10:47

Why does the compiler insist that X be declared incompletely as: struct X?? After all, as the author notes: "compiler always knows how to pass an address which is of a fixed size.."

You don't: this works too:

struct Y { void f(struct X*); };

class X {
    int i;
    friend void Y::f(X*);
};

What else do you propose?

Also, you don't even have to have the complete type, when passing by value unless you actually define the method:

struct Y { void f(struct X); };

// too early:    
void Y::f(struct X) { /* whoops compile error */ }

class X {
    int i;
    friend void Y::f(X);
};

// ok here:
void Y::f(X) { /* compile success */ }
share|improve this answer

After all, as the author notes: "compiler always knows how to pass an address which is of a fixed size.." This is just a declaration that tells the compiler that X is a struct and soon to follow, so why is the compiler so insistent that you type out the letters: struct X; after all i'm not using X per se?? There's no assembly language code being generated at that point.. and when it reads the "X*" surely it can tell that it's an address(pointer).. why is: struct X; needed??

The author isn't telling you all the nasty details. The compiler knows how to pass a pointer (an address), if it knows what kind of object X is. The language allows some pointers, like pointer to char on a word-adressable machine, or a pointer to function, to be of a different size.

Therefore, you must tell the compiler that X is a struct and not a function or a typedef for a built in type.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent backgrounder – sehe Jun 22 '12 at 11:39

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