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I'm trying to write a piece of code that takes in a two digit hex number, e.g. "0C", and compares it to a list.

I'm using Java 6 so can't switch on a string and was initially planning on using switch on Enums but didn't realise that Enums have to start with a letter.

Is there a simple way to achieve something like the following without a whole series of "if, else if..." statements?:

public void code(String oc) {

switch (oc) {
    case 00:
        // do something
        break;
    case 0A:
        // do something else
        break;
    case A1:
                   ....
             }

Thanks, Robert.

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1  
You shouldn't choose the appropriate type to use based on whether it's usable in a switch statement or not. Use an enum if it's an enum. Use a String if it's a String. I really don't understand the advantage of a switch over if/else if. –  JB Nizet Jun 22 '12 at 10:52
    
Ah, OK. Someone told me switch was more efficient than if/else for this type of thing. If that's not the case I'll go down the if/else route. –  Robert Jun 22 '12 at 10:55
    
You can use interface defining the desired function and put them in a hashmap. But you're converting hex numbers to string and then find that you'd prefer a number. Why convert ? –  dystroy Jun 22 '12 at 10:56
    
You're preoptimizing. That's the root of all evil. This is not where you'll have performance problems. –  JB Nizet Jun 22 '12 at 10:58
1  
Switch is more efficient in most cases, but it's a perfect example of a "root of all evil" type of premature micro-optimization: you have no idea whether that part of the code is actually performance-relevant, yet you're willing to waste time and compromise your design to optimize it. –  Michael Borgwardt Jun 22 '12 at 10:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In Java 6, it is not possible to do this directly. You have to convert the String values to numbers (somehow), and then switch on the numbers. For instance:

switch (Integer.parseInt(oc, 16)) {
case 0x00:
    // do something
    break;
case 0x0A:
    // do something else
    break;
case 0xA1:
    ....
}

The string to number conversion is relatively expensive, and probably negates the performance benefit of using a switch ... unless you have a large number of distinct cases.

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+1 sure, but isn't it about time you got an avatar? Or are you trying to be the incognito user with the highest rep? –  Bohemian Jun 22 '12 at 10:59
    
What makes you think that's not an avatar? Some people are very spikey :-) –  Stephen C Jun 22 '12 at 11:00
    
Stephen C, that worked a treat. Thank you very much, sir! –  Robert Jun 22 '12 at 11:01
    
Anyhow Jonathon Leffler holds that title, and I've no chance of beating his rep. (Not that this is a competition ... :-) ) –  Stephen C Jun 22 '12 at 11:11
    
You're only 30K behind him. Come on... You can do it! (but not if you keep getting owned like just then - he wanted an enum solution and I gave him one :D ) –  Bohemian Jun 22 '12 at 11:31

You can use an enum, just put a letter in front, like this:

public enum MyEnum {
    X00,
    X0A,
    XA1
    // etc
}

public void code(String oc) {

    switch (MyEnum.valueOf("X" + oc)) { 
        case X00:
            // do something
            break;
        case X0A:
            // do something
            break;
        case XA1:
            // do something
            break;
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That works a treat too, thanks. –  Robert Jun 22 '12 at 11:26

If you need to select exactly one element for each case, you can put everything into a hashmap:

private final static Value DEFAULT_VALUE = ...;
private final static HashMap<Key, Value> A_MAP = new HashMap<Key, Value>();
static { // populate the map
     A_MAP.put(..., ...);
     ...
}

// query value for key:
public Value get(final Key key) {
    final Value result = A_MAP.get(key);
    return result == null ? DEFAULT_VALUE : result;
}

Obviously Key and Value need to be replaced with the concrete types to be used.

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You can use a Map and reflection. First initialize your map and create a single method for each case:

Map<String, Method> cases = new HashMap<String, Method>();

private void doSomething(param1, param2... etc) {
    // do your stuff
}

private void doSomethingElse(param1, param2... etc) {
    // do other stuff
}

cases.put("00", this.getClass().getMethod("doSomething", param1.class, param2.class, ..);
cases.put("0A", this.getClass().getMethod("doSomethingElse", param1.class, param2.class, ..);

// etc.

And then, when you need to use the switch:

cases.get(yourCase).invoke(this, param1, param2, etc.);
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you may use nested switches for the first and second character:

    char c0 = oc.charAt(0);
    char c1 = oc.charAt(1);

    switch(c0) {
    case '0':
        switch(c1) {
        case '1':
            // ...
        }
        // ...
    }

but this is only readable if there are only few codes to switch on.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. There are a couple of hundred to switch on so probably not appropriate but good to know regardless. –  Robert Jun 22 '12 at 12:03

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