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I have three different files which contain columns of numbers in them. These files are very large (having 50,000,000+ lines in them)

as an example, the data format looks like

1.2 22.333 10002.3432 223.2111
50.2166 2.873 15402.3432 322.1
.
.
.

For each of files (file1, file2 and file3) I need to do the followng:

FILE1 Find the lines containing any number x <=1000 and delete the lines from file1

FILE2 Find the lines containing any number x >=1800 and delete the lines from file2

FILE3 Find the lines containing any number 1000<= x <=1800 and delete the lines from file3.

My knowledge of REGEX is not sufficient to figure out how to achieve this quickly. Any help is much appreciated.

share|improve this question
2  
Comparing numbers is generally not the task regex is used for. – Lev Levitsky Jun 22 '12 at 11:56
    
sed and regexes probably won't help because they don't understand numbers. Awk might do it, but I would recommend perl for this task. – John Watts Jun 22 '12 at 11:59
2  
+1 for perl, definitely – display101 Jun 22 '12 at 12:06
    
Each file has four columns? – Beta Jun 22 '12 at 12:12
    
+1 to all for beating me so quickly... Man it's hard to answer new questions here. lol – ZnArK Jun 22 '12 at 12:26
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Where the input file "sample" is:

500 500 500
1000 1000 1000
2000 2000 2000
3000 3000 3000

Strip x <= 1000:

$ awk '{ for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) { if ($i <= 1000) next } print }' < sample
2000 2000 2000
3000 3000 3000

Strip x >= 1800:

$ awk '{ for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) { if ($i >= 1800) next } print }' < sample
500 500 500
1000 1000 1000

Strip 1000 <= x <= 1800:

$ awk '{ for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) { if (1000 <= $i && $i <= 1800) next } print }' < sample
500 500 500
2000 2000 2000
3000 3000 3000
share|improve this answer
    
aha... we seemed to have come up with identical solutions. +1 for beating me by 20 secs ;) – Shawn Chin Jun 22 '12 at 12:22

As others have mentioned in the comments, regex is not ideal in this case.

Here's one way of doing it using awk:

awk '{for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) {if ($i<=1000) next}; if (NF) print}' file1 > new1

That parses file and suppresses any lines any contains numbers <= 1000 (and empty lines). The output is then piped to a new file.

For file2 and file3, simply change the conditions in the relevant if statement to match your requirements.


Here's a quick explanation:

         This is repeated for each line in the input file
                                |
      -------------------------------------------------------
     /                                                       \
awk '{for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) {if ($i<=1000) next}; if (NF) print}'
      ------------------   ------------------   -------------
             |                     |                  |
     for each field/column         |                  |
                                   |                  |
                      If condition is met, skip       |
                             this line                |
                                                      |
                                          otherwise, if the line is
                                          not empty (number of fields != 0)
                                          print out the whole line.
share|improve this answer
    
which part suppresses empty lines? is that second if-statement? – regex99 Jun 22 '12 at 12:25
    
@regex99 The "if (NF)" bit. – Shawn Chin Jun 22 '12 at 12:27
    
Very nice explanation. Thanks so much. – regex99 Jun 22 '12 at 12:31

Here is a reasonably short Perl script that outputs your FILE3:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;

our $lower = 1000.0;
our $upper = 1800.0;

OUTER: while (<>) {
    $_ >= $lower && $_ < $upper and next OUTER for /(\S+)/g;
    print;
}

You can adjust for FILE1 and FILE2.

(For better or for worse, my script is thick with basic Perl idiom, which despite the script's brevity makes it almost unreadable if you don't know Perl. Still, that's how it's done in Perl, a scripting language you would enjoy learning, one suspects.)

share|improve this answer
    
I bow before your perl brevity. Well done sir. – ZnArK Jun 22 '12 at 12:24
    
not bad, yeah. good and simple script with all perl features. like your style. – gaussblurinc Jun 22 '12 at 12:41

Something like the following script should work for you.

#!/usr/bin/perl
while(<>) {
    my $line = $_;
    foreach my $col (split ' ', $line){     #for each column
        unless ($col <= 1000) {
            print $line;
        }
        #add other statements for other files
    }
}

Edit - Made code more efficient Thanks TLP

share|improve this answer
    
Not as short as others, but is readable and get the jobs done. – ZnArK Jun 22 '12 at 12:23
    
You should use for my $col (split ' ', $line) instead of using an index. You should use split ' ' or else double spaces will insert empty strings in your list. And storing 50,000,000+ elements in your array and printing them will reak havok with your performance -- you should just print the lines right away. – TLP Jun 22 '12 at 12:48
    
good call, you're absolutely right – ZnArK Jun 22 '12 at 12:49
1  
You are welcome. I fixed your code, btw. – TLP Jun 22 '12 at 13:01
    
Good call, guess I missed a couple things. – ZnArK Jun 22 '12 at 13:09

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