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How to request a random row in SQL?

Currently Using:

$randomQuery = mysql_fetch_row(mysql_query("SELECT * FROM `table` WHERE `id` >= RAND() * (SELECT MAX(`id`) FROM `table`) LIMIT 1"));

Table Structure:

id:
 2 
 4
 5

I want to make sure it's selecting an existing row. For example, it shouldn't be able to use 1 or 3 in its randomizing function. Is there a way to do this in MySQL?

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marked as duplicate by George Stocker Jun 23 '12 at 14:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
This is biased depending of the holes but I don't see how this could select a non existing row. –  Denys Séguret Jun 22 '12 at 12:02
    
Any solution using RAND() will be slow because it can't do an index. For faster, properly indexed solution, see my answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/10677767/… –  Spudley Jun 22 '12 at 19:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I think

SELECT * FROM table ORDER BY RAND() LIMIT 1

would do the trick.

See:

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/mathematical-functions.html#function_rand

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Does this take into account deleted rows? –  Aaron Goff Jun 22 '12 at 12:04
    
deleted rows - i think - are removed from the storage engine, so they will not be included in the result. If you only have a deleted flag in the row instead of DELETEing the row completely you need to add a WHERE deleted=0 to your statement –  McIntosh Jun 22 '12 at 12:44
SELECT * FROM table ORDER BY RAND() LIMIT 1
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this will work, but will be slow because it won't use an index. –  Spudley Jun 22 '12 at 19:31
SELECT * FROM `table` ORDER BY RAND() LIMIT 0,1;

http://akinas.com/pages/en/blog/mysql_random_row/

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Your initial query does take care of the holes as it simply compares the id of a row to the random value you compute and doesn't try to fetch a row having a random id.

Its problem is that it gives you a non uniform probability : Any row following a big hole has a bigger probability of being selected.

That's the reason why it's suggested to use the mysql trick ORDER BY RAND() (see other answers) as the randomization will be quasi uniform.

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