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Traditionally, to read a file filled with an array in python, I use the following syntax

x, y, z = loadtxt("myfile.txt", unpack=True)

It works well for single-array files.

Now, I have a more complicated file :

1.5 3.5 2.5 1.6
4
3
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20
1 2
3 4
5 6

What I want to do is the following thing :

1.5 3.5 2.5 1.6 -> I want to put them in an array of three variables + 1 scalar

4 -> A = 4, Number of lines of my first array

3 -> B = 3, Number of lines of my second array

My first array with A = 4 lines that I want to load in 5 variables (like the command loadtxt("", unpack = True)

1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20

My first array with B = 3 lines that I want to load in 2 variables (like the command loadtxt("", unpack = True)

1 2
3 4
5 6

Is there any technique to do this kind of things in python ?

Thank you very much.

share|improve this question
2  
This is pretty trivial parsing task. What have you tried? –  larsmans Jun 22 '12 at 12:05
    
I don't know python very well, so I don't know how to parse files with several array size. –  Vincent Jun 22 '12 at 12:07
    
I don't understand the first line. Also, how do you distinguish between a nx1 array and an array length? –  Benjamin Jun 22 '12 at 13:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You are specifying your own file format, which is not very useful. I would suggest using an existing format such as JSON:

myfile.txt:

{
    "a" : [
        [1, 2, 3, 4, 5],
        [6, 7, 8, 9, 10],
        [11, 12, 13, 14, 15],
        [16, 17, 18, 19, 20]
    ],
    "b" : [
    ...
    ]
}

read.py

import json
myfile = open("myfile.txt")
myVars = json.load(myfile)
myfile.close()
myVars['a']
share|improve this answer

you can open a file in python like so:

f = open("myfile.txt")

now you can go through all lines and in each line you can split it by a space:

for line in f.readlines():
    linearray = line.split(' ')
    arraylength = len(linearray)
    print("Array length: "+str(arraylength))

the rest is up to you.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this approach as long as the lines in your file are guaranteed to only have 1 space between each number. For instance len("1-2-3").split('-') = 3, while len("1--2--3").split('-') = 5. You may want to one-space the lines you read from your files first. EDIT: I tried using spaces in my comment, but it didn't come out formatted correctly. Same idea with dashes, though. –  Valdogg21 Jun 22 '12 at 12:19
3  
You don't need .split(' '), do just .split() –  Diego Navarro Jun 22 '12 at 12:21
2  
(1) with open("myfile.txt") as f: is a better habit to get into; (2) for line in f: works just as well as calling .readlines() and has better memory properties; (3) linearray = line.split() will handle both multiple spaces and tabs. –  DSM Jun 22 '12 at 12:22
    
Thank you for your comments. But i also wanted to make the code as self describing as possible. It is better practise to use your suggestions, but it seemed to me, that it's more about the fundamental understanding. –  devsnd Jun 22 '12 at 14:20

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