Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I got one implementation of read/write locks which is below. Notice that in the beginning of the functions, there is a pthread_mutex_lock call. If it uses pthread_mutex_lock once anyway, then what is the benefit of using read/write locks. How is it better than simply using pthread_mutex_lock?

int pthread_rwlock_rlock_np(pthread_rwlock_t *rwlock)
{
    pthread_mutex_lock(&(rwlock->mutex));
    rwlock->r_waiting++;
    while (rwlock->r_wait > 0)
    {
        pthread_cond_wait(&(rwlock->r_ok), &(rwlock->mutex));
    }
    rwlock->reading++;
    rwlock->r_waiting--;
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&(rwlock->mutex));
    return 0;
}

int pthread_rwlock_wlock_np(pthread_rwlock_t *rwlock)
{
    pthread_mutex_lock(&(rwlock->mutex));
    if(pthread_mutex_trylock(&(rwlock->w_lock)) == 0)
    {
        rwlock->r_wait = 1;
        rwlock->w_waiting++;
        while (rwlock->reading > 0)
        {
            pthread_cond_wait(&(rwlock->w_ok), &(rwlock->mutex));
        }
        rwlock->w_waiting--;
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&(rwlock->mutex));
        return 0;
    }
    else
    {
        rwlock->wu_waiting++;
        while (pthread_mutex_trylock(&(rwlock->w_lock)) != 0)
        {
            pthread_cond_wait(&(rwlock->w_unlock), &(rwlock->mutex));
        }
        rwlock->wu_waiting--;
        rwlock->r_wait = 1;
        rwlock->w_waiting++;
        while (rwlock->reading > 0)
        {
            pthread_cond_wait(&(rwlock->w_ok), &(rwlock->mutex));
        }
        rwlock->w_waiting--;
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&(rwlock->mutex));
        return 0;
    }
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The rwlock->mutex mutex is used to protect the state of the rwlock structure itself, not the state of whatever the reader/writer lock may be protecting in your target program. This mutex is held only during the time the lock is acquired or released. It is entered into just briefly, to avoid corrupting the state that is needed for "bookkeeping" of the reader/writer lock itself. In contrast, the reader/writer lock may be held for an extended period of time by the callers performing the actual reads and writes on the structure the lock protects.

share|improve this answer

In both functions, rwlock->mutex is released before returning. That means that just because you hold an rwlock as reader or writer, doesn't mean you hold the mutex.

Half the point of a rwlock is that multiple readers can operate simultaneously, so that's the immediate advantage over just using a mutex. Those readers only hold the mutex briefly, in order to acquire the reader lock. They don't hold the mutex while they do their actual work.

share|improve this answer

It will allows multiple read OR a single write at a time, which is better than one read OR one write operation at a time.

share|improve this answer

How is it better than simply using pthread_mutex_lock?

  1. Even with this implementation, the readers will run simultaneously in the critical section.
  2. There could be a better (less portable) implementation that would use atomics in the "fast path" (locking would still be needed when waiting).
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.