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I am trying to get this working in Scala:

class MyClass(some: Int, func: AnyRef* => Int) {
}

The above code won't compile (why?) but the following does:

class MyClass(some: Int, func: Seq[AnyRef] => Int) {
}

That's OK but are the two equivalent? And if so, then how can I then use func inside MyClass?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The first one (with varargs) works if you use parentheses:

class MyClass(some: Int, func: (AnyRef*) => Int)

The two forms of func, however are not the same. The first version takes a vararg input, so you would call it like func(a,b,c,d), but the second version takes a Seq as input, so you would call it like func(Seq(a,b,c,d)).

Compare this:

class MyClass(some: Int, func: (AnyRef*) => Int) {
  def something() = {
    func("this","and","that") + 2
  }
}

to this:

class MyClass(some: Int, func: Seq[AnyRef] => Int) {
  def something() = {
    func(Seq("this","and","that")) + 2
  }
}
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Now, my question is what's the meaning of () wrapping around AnyRef*? –  nobeh Jun 22 '12 at 14:14
1  
They're just parentheses to tell Scala that AnyRef* should be taken fully as the function's input. Just like how (1+2)*3 tell you that 1+2 should be taken fully as the first argument to +. –  dhg Jun 22 '12 at 14:20
    
Thanks for the answers. –  nobeh Jun 22 '12 at 14:41
1  
@nobeh The parenthesis around AnyRef* is the standard when specifying input parameters to a function. Their absence in the case of single-parameter function is a syntactic sugar exception. –  Daniel C. Sobral Jun 22 '12 at 19:46

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