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I have the following problem.

I have a file with a lot of words inside what I have to do is find these words in another file and replace them with just one letter.

I do not know the words that I have to delete (too many!) so I don't know how to use the following sed command

$ sed -i 's/words_old/word_new/g' /home/user/test.txt

however I think I have to use also the cat command:

$ cat filewithwordstobedeleted.txt

but I don't know how to combine them.

Thank you for helping me! :)

Fabio

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Where do the word_new come from? Are they also specified in filewithwordstobedeleted.txt, next to each word, or do you replace all words with the same letter? –  Pieter Müller Jun 22 '12 at 13:48
    
I have to replace all the words with just the word "null" –  fabioln79 Jun 22 '12 at 13:50
1  
Beware of making a clbuttic mistake. –  Dennis Williamson Jun 22 '12 at 14:51

3 Answers 3

A simple shell loop could help you here, assuming you have one word-to-be-deleted per line:

cat filewithwordstobedeleted.txt | while read word; do
    sed -i "s/$word/null/g" /home/user/test.txt
done

Note that the use of cat is not strictly necessary, but makes this example easier to read.

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1  
For the curious, a cat-less alternative is while read word; do ...; done < filewithwordstobedeleted.txt –  chepner Jun 22 '12 at 14:01
    
This was also going to be my suggestion. I was wondering, however, if it would be slower, due to the multiple invocations of sed, than if you could somehow do it with a single sed run? –  Pieter Müller Jun 22 '12 at 14:07
    
I've tried but it works in a strange way maybe is due to the fact that I do not have one word per line. So instead of replacing each word with "null" is putting "null" in each line. It should work in this way: orange pineapple apple (same line) --> null null null or orangepineappleapple --> nullnullnull –  fabioln79 Jun 22 '12 at 14:49

If your list of words is one-per-line and not ridiculously long:

sed -ri "s/$(tr "\n" "|" < filewithwordstobedeleted.txt | head -c-1)/null/g" /home/user/test.txt
share|improve this answer
    
no, unfortunately is not a list of words but a series of words on the same line like: orange pineapple apple (same line) that I would like to have as null null null or orangepineappleapple --> nullnullnull. Yes, it is ridiculously long but the time is not a problem. I can leave it running on a server w/o any issue. –  fabioln79 Jun 22 '12 at 15:04
    
@fabioln79: I mean if the list of words to be deleted (filewithwordstobedeleted.txt) is one per line. My command works if the file to modify has multiple words per line. The length isn't about the runtime, but whether it exceeds the command line capacity of the system you're running on (2MB on my system). –  Dennis Williamson Jun 22 '12 at 15:06

This might work for you (GNU sed):

# cat <<\! >/tmp/a
> this
> that
> those
> !
cat <<\! >/tmp/b
> a
> those
> b
> this
> c
> that
> d
> !
sed 's|.*|s/&/null/g|' /tmp/a
s/this/null/g
s/that/null/g
s/those/null/g
sed 's|.*|s/&/null/g|' /tmp/a | sed -f - /tmp/b
a
null
b
null
c
null
d
cat <<\! >/tmp/c
> a
> this and that and those
> b
> this and that
> c
> those
> !
sed 's|.*|s/&/null/g|' /tmp/a | sed -f - /tmp/c
a
null and null and null
b
null and null
c
null
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