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I want to write two classes, in superclass i need method witch as a parameter have a subclass like in this sample code:

class class1
{
    int a;
    void print(class2 k)
    {
        cout<<k.b*a;
    }  
};

class class2 :public class1
{
    public:
    int b;
};

Unfortunately this isn't right ;-) and i can't figure it out, could anybody help?

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Do you really want to pass this thing by value? –  John Dibling Jun 22 '12 at 14:18
1  
@JohnDibling I think an even better question is "do you really want to pass a derived class to a base class?" –  Luchian Grigore Jun 22 '12 at 14:19
    
That is a better question, but you already asked it in your answer. :) –  John Dibling Jun 22 '12 at 14:26

3 Answers 3

Use a forward declaration and move the implementation outside the class:

class class2;
class class1
{
    int a;
    void print(class2 k);
};

class class2 :public class1
{
    public:
    int b;
};

You can't keep the method inline because you need a full type for class2 which can't be available at that point.

But the main issue here is the design, which is wrong. Why would a base class need to know and more-so call methods from a derived class?

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My answer was wrong. Didn't know you can pass by value after forward declaration. Cool! –  Andrew Jun 22 '12 at 14:10
    
@Andrew I actually had my doubts first time. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 22 '12 at 14:13
    
thanks a lot, i tried something like that but get confused and keep making mistakes ;-). –  Mateusz Pilski Jun 22 '12 at 14:15
class class2;

class class1
{
    int a;
    inline void print(class2 &k); //pass by reference, but implemented after class2 is completely known to the compiler.
};

class class2 :public class1
{
    public:
    int b;
};

void class1::print(class2 &k)
{
    cout<<k.b*a;
}  
share|improve this answer
    
Why pass by reference? I mean you can, but you don't have to. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 22 '12 at 14:11
    
Because the compiler has to know at least size of the parameter wqhen it sees the prototype, and for class2 it cannot know it. But it can for reference class2& or pointer class2*. –  mity Jun 22 '12 at 14:13
    
That's wrong, you can pass by value with only a forward declaration. See my answer. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 22 '12 at 14:18

One possible solution to your problem is not to implement print() within the base class but to oblige any inheriting class to implement it using a pure virtual function. At the moment, you'd probbaly call your code using:

class2 c2;
c2.b = 20; // for example
class1 c1;
c1.print( c2 );

but maybe a better way to implement this would be as follows:

class class1
{
protected:
    int a;

public:
    virtual void print() const = 0;
};

class class2 : public class1
{
public:
    int b;
    void print() const;
};

void class2::print() const
{
    cout << b * a;
}

So now class2 is obliged to implement the print function which is correct in a sense because class2 should know about class1 but not vice-versa. Now you can do this:

class2 c2;
c2.b = 20; // for example
c2.print()

Of course, this may not help you with what you want to do but I would think it's generally a better way of approaching the problem you describe.

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