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I am using the XML regex pattern to match my proxy URL.

eg: Proxy : ab-proxy-sample.company.com:8080

My requirement :

  1. Should not begin with http:// OR https:// (Match the whole word)
  2. Should accept any string + a port
  3. Should accept even strings starting with ht

My current XML regex is : [^http://|https://].+:[0-9]+|

But its matching each letter instead of the whole word ?

Any help would be highly appreciated. Thanks in advance !

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Using [] means that you match any character. Your regex says: do not match any of those characters: :/|htp. Use negative lookahead to not-match complete words. –  arnep Jun 22 '12 at 14:17
    
Hi arnep... Thanks! I am fairly new to this. What do you mean by a negative lookaheaed? Could you please give me an example ? (I want to avoid the whole word http:// or https://) –  simplysiby Jun 22 '12 at 14:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As @arnep points out, you're attempting to use a negated character class with alternation, which isn't the way it works. Also, here is some information regarding lookaheads.

I'm sure someone else will post an answer you can copy and paste, but this is a useful opportunity to learn the basics of regex!

UPDATE:

I didn't realize that you were using an engine that doesn't support negative lookarounds. Without negative lookarounds, it's nearly impossible to achieve what you're trying to do.

Nearly ;)

Here is a "brute-force" combinatoric method of doing it:

(?:[^h]|h(?:[^t]|t(?:[^t]|t(?:[^p]|p(?:[^s:]|s(?:[^:]|:(?:[^\/]|\/(?:[^\/])))|:(?:[^\/]|\/(?:[^\/])))))))\S+:\d+
  1. If the XML engine doesn't support non-captured groups, i.e. (?: ... ) then use regular groups instead:

    ([^h]|h([^t]|t([^t]|t([^p]|p([^s:]|s([^:]|:([^\/]|\/([^\/])))|:([^\/]|\/([^\/])))))))\S+:\d+
    
  2. If the XML engine doesn't support characters classes like \S and \d then use [^ \t\r\n\p] and [0-9] instead.

Here is a running example: http://rubular.com/r/JnpCVgeLmL. Try changing the test string. You'll see that...

    ab-proxy-sample.company.com:8080          # matches
    htab-proxy-sample.company.com:8080        # matches
    http://ab-proxy-sample.company.com:8080   # doesn't
    https://ab-proxy-sample.company.com:8080  # doesn't
    httpd://ab-proxy-sample.company.com:8080  # matches

Note that you do not need the ^ and $. I added these specifically for the Rubular demo, but apparently the XML engine assumes this condition (anchored-ness).

How does this work? It's easier to understand if we break it up like this:

    ([^h] | h
    ([^t] | t
    ([^t] | t
    ([^p] | p
    ([^s:]| s ([^:]|:([^\/]|\/([^\/])))
          | :        ([^\/]|\/([^\/])))
    ))))
    \S+:\d+

The explanation:

  1. If the first char isn't an "h", then great! (The string can't possibly be "http://" or "https://".)
  2. If the first char is an "h" though, then:
    1. If the second char isn't a "t", then great! (The string can't possibly be "http://" or "https://".)
    2. If the second char is a "t" though, then:
      1. ... isn't "t", great!
      2. ... is "t", then:
        1. ... isn't "p", great!
        2. ... is "p", then:

Here, it gets tricky: now we encounter three branches.

  1. If the fifth char isn't an "s" nor a ":", then great!
  2. If the fifth char is an "s" though, then:
    1. If the sixth char isn't a ":", then great!
    2. If the sixth char is a ":" though, then:
      1. If the seventh char isn't a "/", then great!
      2. If the seventh char is a "/" though, then:
        1. If the eighth char isn't a "/", then great!
        2. Otherwise, fail! We found an "https://".
  3. If the fifth char is a ":" though, then:
    1. If the sixth char isn't a "/", then great!
    2. If the sixth char is a "/" though, then:
      1. If the seventh char isn't a "/", then great!
      2. Otherwise, fail! We found an "http://".

And finally, if we've gotten this far, then we look for a string of non-whitespace characters, followed by a colon, followed by a string of digits.

I leave it to a smarter mathematician than myself to ponder whether all strings matchable using lookarounds can be "brute-forced" in such a way.

share|improve this answer
    
Here's some hints though. .+ matches whitespace too. You may want to consider \S+ instead. You've got the [0-9]+ right, although it can be shortened to \d+. –  Andrew Cheong Jun 22 '12 at 14:37
    
Hi acheong87...thanks for your help. But as per regular-expressions.info/refflavors.html, XML does not support negative lookahead... Is there any other alternative ? –  simplysiby Jun 25 '12 at 13:19
    
@simplysiby - I've updated my solution. Please give it a try and let me know if it works. –  Andrew Cheong Jun 25 '12 at 15:55
    
Thanks a lot for your detailed answer !! I had to remove escape for the forward slash. Its finally working with : ([^h]|h([^t]|t([^t]|t([^p]|p([^s:]|s([^:]|:([^/]|/([^/])))|:([^/]|/([^/])))))))‌​\S+:\d+ . Thanks again !! –  simplysiby Jun 26 '12 at 13:47
    
Thanks for that useful tip ! Answer accepted !! –  simplysiby Jun 26 '12 at 15:42

To avoid matching a string starting with some word, use negative look ahead:

^(?!https?).*$

will match any strings that do not start with http(s). The other requirements are left to the reader as an exercise :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Arnep, Thanks for your help.... but I am using XML regex pattern and this is not supported. –  simplysiby Jun 25 '12 at 13:34
    
@simplysiby I don't know "XML regex pattern", do you have more information about that? –  arnep Jun 25 '12 at 14:10

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