Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been out of touch with Algorithms for a while and have start revising my concepts these days. To my surprise the last i remember of my recursions skill was that i was good at it but not anymore. So, i have a basic question for you guys which is confusing me. Please see the below code first ..

private void mergesort(int low, int high) {
    if (low < high) {
        int middle = (low + high)/2 ;
        System.out .println ("Before the 1st Call");
        mergesort(low, middle);
        System.out .println ("After the 1st Call");
        mergesort(middle+1, high);
        System.out .println ("After the 2nd Call");
        merge(low, middle, high);
    }
}

The function call

mergesort(0,7);

And the output is

Before the 1st Call

Before the 1st Call

Before the 1st Call

After the 1st Call

After the 2nd Call

After the 1st Call

Before the 1st Call

After the 1st Call

After the 2nd Call

After the 2nd Call

After the 1st Call

Before the 1st Call

Before the 1st Call

After the 1st Call

After the 2nd Call

After the 1st Call

Before the 1st Call

After the 1st Call

After the 2nd Call

After the 2nd Call

After the 2nd Call

The thing confusing me in the above code and result is the second recursive call. I am understanding the flow until the fourth output line ( i.e : After the 1st Call). But i cannot understand why does it outputs ( After the 2nd Call ) after the ( After the 1st Call ). According to whati am understanding from the code After the output ( After the 1st Call ) the mergesort function with parameter (middle+1, high) should be called and it should output ( Before the 1st call ) and go into the recursive call with mergesort (low, middle). I am comfartable with one recursive call functions and understand and am sync with foreg fibonacci example .

share|improve this question
    
Try giving it a smaller numbers, then trace through the output. It might make it a little easier to see. –  John Kane Jun 22 '12 at 14:19
2  
Use a debugger! not this println garbage! –  Colin D Jun 22 '12 at 14:20
add comment

7 Answers 7

up vote 15 down vote accepted

On the fourth output line, you have returned from the first call and the subsequent 2 recursive calls, so now control reaches the System.out .println ("After the 1st Call");

So, the condition low < high is false after the second recursive call, so you just exit the function. Then, control returns to the line right after the second recursive call.

TIP One thing I used to do when learning recursion is to keep track of stack depth (e.g. pass in a parameter for this) and then on your output you indent your output based on stack depth. This helps you visualize where you are in the recursive chain, and makes debugging easier.

So your debugging input could look similar to the following:

entered method, low = 0, high = 10
  entered method, low = 0, high = 5
     entered method, low = 0, high = 2
     exiting method, low = 0, high = 2
  exiting method, low = 0, high = 5
exiting method, low = 0, high = 10
share|improve this answer
6  
+1 for keeping track of stack depth. –  Colin D Jun 22 '12 at 14:21
    
Thanks DCP, I understand your answer. As for the TIP, i didnot get it. I googled it but that too didnt revealed any conclusive answers. So i will create a new thread for it. –  LivingThing Jun 22 '12 at 14:47
add comment

Just follow the execution...

First call 0,7 --> enters if, middle = 3 (integer division), calls again as (0,3)
Second call 0,3 --> enters if, middle = 1, calls again as (0,1)
Third call 0,1 --> enters if, middle = 0, calls again as (0,0)
Fourth call 0,0 --> does not enter if, back to third call
Third call 0,1 --> calls as middle+1,high which is (1,1)
Fifth call 1,1 --> does not enter if, back to third call
Third call 0,1 --> calls the string you didn't expect

can continue on but that is where the string you aren't expecting is executed.

share|improve this answer
1  
That is the same answer I got. Pen and paper can help, but follow it with a debugger to really make this simple. –  BlackVegetable Jun 22 '12 at 14:20
add comment

You could print out the values of high and low too. It would be much easier to follow the recursion.

share|improve this answer
1  
solid advice, but it would be better to just step through using a debugger. then he has access to all of the data! –  Colin D Jun 22 '12 at 14:22
add comment

Try printing the value of the middle variable.

Best practise dictates that you don't code in "Before function" style debugging messages without any variable output.

share|improve this answer
add comment

After 4 line of output low = 0, middle = 0, high = 1 so calling mergesort(middle+1,high) wont print nothing ( 1 < 1 is false)

share|improve this answer
add comment

The indentation in the following corresponds to the recursion:

mergesort(0, 7)
    middle=3
    "Before the 1st Call"
    mergesort(0, 3)
        middle=1
        "Before the 1st Call"
        mergesort(0, 1)
            middle=0
            "Before the 1st Call"
            mergesort(0, 0)
                (0 < 0) is false so return
        "After the 1st Call"
        mergesort(1, 1)
            (1 < 1) is false so return
        "After the 2nd Call"

        etc ...
share|improve this answer
add comment

Run this piece of code to understand recursion well.I have considered the stack depth in the console.Hope it makes it easy to understand!

    #include "stdafx.h"
    #include <iomanip>
    using namespace std;
    static int stackdepth=0;
    void mergesort(int[],int,int);
    void merge(int[],int,int,int);
    void  space(int);
    int main(int argc,char *argv[])
    {
        int a[8]={5,7,1,4,9,3,2,0};
        mergesort(a,0,7);
        for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
    //  cout<<a[i]<<endl;
        return 0;
    }
    void mergesort(int a[],int low,int high)
    {
        int mid;

        if(low<high)
        {

            mid=(low+high)/2;
            space(stackdepth);
            cout<<"First Recursion Enter";
            cout<<" Low :"<<low<<" Mid :"<<mid<<endl;
            stackdepth++;
            mergesort(a,low,mid);
            stackdepth--;
            space(stackdepth);
            cout<<"First Recursion Exit";
            cout<<" Low :"<<low<<" Mid :"<<mid<<endl;
            space(stackdepth);
            stackdepth++;
            cout<<"Second Recursion Enter";
            cout<<" Mid+1 :"<<mid+1<<" High :"<<high<<endl;
            mergesort(a,mid+1,high);
            stackdepth--;
            space(stackdepth);
            cout<<"Second Recursion Exit";
            cout<<" Low :"<<mid+1<<" High :"<<high<<endl;
            space(stackdepth);
            cout<<"Merge Low :"<<low<<" Mid :"<<mid<<"High :"<<high<<endl;
            merge(a,low,mid,high);
            cout<<endl;
            space(stackdepth);
            cout<<"------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------"<<endl;
        }
    }
    void space(int stackdepth)
    {
        for(int i=0;i<stackdepth;i++)
        cout<<"                     ";

    }
    void merge(int a[],int low,int mid,int high)
    {
    //  cout<<endl;
    //  cout<<"Merging Begins"<<endl;
        int b[8];
        int i,k,j;
        i=low;k=low;j=mid+1;
        while(i<=mid && j<=high)
        {
            if(a[i]<a[j])
            {
                    b[k++]=a[i++];
            }
            else
            {
                b[k++]=a[j++];
            }
        }
        while(i<=mid)
            b[k++]=a[i++];
        while(j<=high)
            b[k++]=a[j++];
        space(stackdepth);
        for(int i=low;i<=high;i++)
        {
            a[i]=b[i];
        cout<<a[i]<<" ";
        }
            //cout<<"Low :"<<low<<" Mid :"<<mid<<" High :"<<high<<endl;
        //  cout<<"Merging Ends"<<endl;
        //  cout<<endl;
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.