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I have a file structure that looks like this

./501.res/1.bin
./503.res/1.bin
./503.res/2.bin
./504.res/1.bin

and I would like to find the file path to the .bin file in each directory which have the highest number as filename. So the output I am looking for would be

./501.res/1.bin
./503.res/2.bin
./504.res/1.bin

The highest number a file can have is 9.

Question

How do I do that in BASH?

I have come as far as find .|grep bin|sort

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What about using awk? You can get the FIRST occurrence really simply:

[ghoti@pc ~]$ cat data1
./501.res/1.bin
./503.res/1.bin
./503.res/2.bin
./504.res/1.bin
[ghoti@pc ~]$ awk 'BEGIN{FS="."} a[$2] {next} {a[$2]=1} 1' data1
./501.res/1.bin
./503.res/1.bin
./504.res/1.bin
[ghoti@pc ~]$ 

To get the last occurrence you could pipe through a couple of sorts:

[ghoti@pc ~]$ sort -r data1 | awk 'BEGIN{FS="."} a[$2] {next} {a[$2]=1} 1' | sort
./501.res/1.bin
./503.res/2.bin
./504.res/1.bin
[ghoti@pc ~]$ 

Given that you're using "find" and "grep", you could probably do this:

find . -name \*.bin -type f -print | sort -r | awk 'BEGIN{FS="."} a[$2] {next} {a[$2]=1} 1' | sort

How does this work?

The find command has many useful options, including the ability to select your files by glob, select the type of file, etc. Its output you already know, and that becomes the input to sort -r.

First, we sort our input data in reverse (sort -r). This insures that within any directory, the highest numbered file will show up first. That result gets fed into awk. FS is the field separator, which makes $2 into things like "/501", "/502", etc. Awk scripts have sections in the form of condition {action} which get evaluated for each line of input. If a condition is missing, the action runs on every line. If "1" is the condition and there is no action, it prints the line. So this script is broken out as follows:

  • a[$2] {next} - If the array a with the subscript $2 (i.e. "/501") exists, just jump to the next line. Otherwise...
  • {a[$2]=1} - set the array a subscript $2 to 1, so that in future the first condition will evaluate as true, then...
  • 1 - print the line.

The output of this awk script will be the data you want, but in reverse order. The final sort puts things back in the order you'd expect.

Now ... that's a lot of pipes, and sort can be a bit resource hungry when you ask it to deal with millions of lines of input at the same time. This solution will be perfectly sufficient for small numbers of files, but if you're dealing with large quantities of input, let us know, and I can come up with an all-in-one awk solution (that will take longer than 60 seconds to write).

UPDATE

Per Dennis' sage advice, the awk script I included above could be improved by changing it from

BEGIN{FS="."} a[$2] {next} {a[$2]=1} 1

to

BEGIN{FS="."} $2 in a {next} {a[$2]} 1

While this is functionally identical, the advantage is that you simply define array members rather than assigning values to them, which may save memory or cpu depending on your implementation of awk. At any rate, it's cleaner.

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It's better to test for existence of an element in an array using $2 in a {next}. Doing it that way doesn't create new array elements simply by referring to them. This is what I meant to say the other day when we were discussing this. By the way, if you use in that way, you can do {a[$2]} instead of {a[$2]=1}, but either will work. –  Dennis Williamson Jun 22 '12 at 15:03
    
@DennisWilliamson, AH, now I understand what you were getting at the other day. Thanks very much for the pointer. :) –  ghoti Jun 22 '12 at 15:12

Globs are guaranteed to be expanded in lexical order.

for dir in ./*/
do
    files=($dir/*)           # create an array
    echo "${files[@]: -1}"   # access its last member
done
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Tested:

find . -type d -name '*.res' | while read dir; do
    find "$dir" -maxdepth 1 | sort -n | tail -n 1
done
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1  
It don't display paths. –  jcubic Jun 22 '12 at 14:47
    
Fixed it. find ... -maxdepth 1 shows the path properly now. Thanks. –  bcelary Jun 25 '12 at 7:30

I came up with someting like this:

for dir in $(find . -mindepth 1 -type d | sort); do
   file=$(ls "$dir" | sort | tail -n 1);
   [ -n "$file" ] && (echo "$dir/$file");
done

Maybe it can be simpler

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I think you should have sort -n as the numbering probably goes higher than 9. –  bcelary Jun 22 '12 at 14:31
    
@bcelary - the OP stated "The highest number a file can have is 9." –  ghoti Jun 22 '12 at 14:44
    
Ah -- sorry. Failed to notice :) –  bcelary Jun 25 '12 at 7:19

If invoking a shell from within find is an option try this

  find * -type d -exec sh -c "echo -n './'; ls -1 {}/*.bin | sort -n -r | head -n 1" \;
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And here is one liner

find . -mindepth 1 -type d | sort | sed -e "s/.*/ls & | sort | tail -n 1 | xargs -I{} echo &\/{}/" | bash
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