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I'm currently working with a big container that i need to iterater over an do lots of things. Which of the following is considered better style?

a) Big Loop:

for (container::iterator it = myContainer.begin(); it < myContainer.end(); ++it) {
    // do thing a with *it

    // do thing d with *it

    // do thing c with *it

    // do thing b with *it
}

b) Small Loops:

for (container::iterator it = myContainer.begin(); it < myContainer.end(); ++it) {
    // do thing a with *it
}

for (container::iterator it = myContainer.begin(); it < myContainer.end(); ++it) {
    // do thing b with *it
}

for (container::iterator it = myContainer.begin(); it < myContainer.end(); ++it) {
    // do thing c with *it
}

for (container::iterator it = myContainer.begin(); it < myContainer.end(); ++it) {
    // do thing d with *it
}

I find b) better to read since a) will get clunky really easy and harder to understand. But a) will run faster I think. So which of those is better style? myContainer will contain up to 10.000 elements and this procedure will have to be repeated so performance is important.

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are they all bound to the same condition? Also, what language are you working with? –  Nadir Sampaoli Jun 22 '12 at 14:44
1  
Have you considered extracting the loop body into a method in the a) option? –  Alexander Pavlov Jun 22 '12 at 14:44
    
@AlexanderPavlov: the whole thing is one single function I don't think splitting loop body into a seperate function would help much, since I need to access a few variables outside the loop. –  Lukas Schmelzeisen Jun 22 '12 at 14:48
    
If performance is important, that trumps the question of "better style." Performance considerations force you to do lots of ugly things. You don't do them unless you have to, but when you do... –  Ben Mathews Jun 22 '12 at 14:49
    
@LukasSchmelzeisen: ok I get the point. Then go for a single loop (if performance is your target), but extract myContainer.end() into a variable and don't use < for the iterator comparison, use ==. (Oh, and don't increment end, increment it instead :)) –  Alexander Pavlov Jun 22 '12 at 14:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should use the single loop. You could refactor the code contained inside the loop into separate functions.

Splitting the big loop into four smaller loops is rather inefficient, it adds superfluous operations.

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