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Here's another problem. I'm using JQuery-1 to add a simple interactivity to one of my pages. In short, the page contains a search text box at the top right, on document.ready I simply call an inputHint() function that adds the phrase "search products" to my textbox. When the user clicks this textbox, I call another function (hideHint() in this case) to hide the default "search products" phrase. Finally if the user leaves the text without typing and clicks anywhere else on the page, I reshow the hint again. Here's a piece of the javascript userd:

$.fn.inputHint = function(options) {
	options = $.extend({hintClass: 'hint'}, options || {});

	function showHint() {			
		if ($(this).val() == '') {	
		$(this).addClass(options.hintClass).val($(this).attr('accesskey'));				
		}
		else{}
	}

	function removeHint() {		
		if ($(this).hasClass(options.hintClass)) $(this).removeClass(options.hintClass).val('');			
	}

and here's the document.ready handler (or whatever you might call it):

$(document).ready(function(){

/* Initialize hint*/    				   
  $(function() {
    $('*[@accesskey]').inputHint();
  });});

This code gets the desired functionality to work like charm but only on Google Chrome, and Safari. IE and Firefox both have a very weired behavior (the hint works fine, but if I reload the page, it magically stops!). Is my code responsible for this weired behavior or is it a problem with JQuery itself (I'v always used to hear that JQuery is compatible with all major browsers)? Ideas!?
PS: this is JQuery-1

share|improve this question
    
What is "JQuery-1"? Is it any different to "jQuery 1.3.2"? (the current release of the official jQuery library) –  Peter Boughton Jul 12 '09 at 12:21
    
Yes I think it's JQuery 1.0, I guess. Actually one of the designers on our team was using it from the beginning. Should I replace it with jQuery 1.3.2? –  Galilyou Jul 12 '09 at 12:26
    
in a word, yes ! –  redsquare Jul 12 '09 at 14:04

2 Answers 2

This might be a bit of a long-shot, there's no need to wrap the call to inputHint() in $function(), as it's already in your ready function. Try this:

$(document).ready(function(){
    /* Initialize hint*/ 
    $('*[@accesskey]').inputHint();    
});
share|improve this answer

I'm not sure why you're using the accesskey attribute to store your hint, but anyways...

$.fn.inputHint = function(options) {
    options = $.extend({ hintClass: 'hint' }, options || {});

    $this = $(this);
    hintValue = $this.attr("accesskey");

    function showHint() {
        if ($this.val() == "") {
            $this.addClass(options.hintClass).val(hintValue);
        }
    }

    function removeHint() {
        if ($this.hasClass(options.hintClass)) {
            $this.removeClass(options.hintClass).val("");
        }
    }

    $this.blur(showHint)
         .focus(removeHint)
         .addClass(options.hintClass)
         .val(hintValue);
};
share|improve this answer

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