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On my final exams I got pretty nasty SQL, relational algebra and relational calculus queries. I got this query:

Find the names of the clients who ordered all products from category 'Computer'. (customers who ordered every product in the computer category)

Here is the schema:

Customer (Customer_Id, Cust_First_Name, Cust_Last_Name)

Orders (Order_Id, *Customer_Id*)

Order_items (Order_Item_id, *Order_Id*, *Product_Id*)

Product_info (Product_Id, Product_Name, Category)

Bold (primary key), Italic (foreign key)

Now to turn this query into relational algebra I need to use joins and not sub-queries. To help myself a little bit I first write SQL and then turn the SQL query into relational algebra.

Here are my tries:

Try 1 (using sub-queries):

select C.Customer_Id
from Customer C
where
(
select count(*)
from product_info
where category = 'Computer'
)=(select count (distinct pi.Product_id)
from orders S, order_items OI, product_info pi
where S.Customer_Id = C.Customer_Id and S.Order_Id = OI.Order_Id and  pi.product_id=OI.product_id and category = 'Computer')

Try 2 (using one sub-query in having clause):

select C.Customer_Id
from Customer C, Product_info pi, Orders S, Order_Items oi
where C.Customer_Id = S.Customer_Id and S.Order_Id = OI.Order_Id and OI.Product_Id = pi.Product_Id and pi.category = 'Computer'
group by C.Customer_Id
having count (distinct pi.Product_Id) = 
(
select count (*) 
from Product_info
where category = 'Computer'
)

Try 3 (sub-query in from clause):

select C.Customer_Id
from Customer C, Product_info pi, Orders S, Order_Items oi,
(
select count (*) num
from Product_info
where category = 'Computer'
) numbr
where C.Customer_Id = S.Customer_Id and S.Order_Id = OI.Order_Id and OI.Product_Id = pi.Product_Id and pi.category = 'Computer'
group by C.Customer_Id, numbr.num
having count (distinct pi.Product_Id) = numbr.num

Now this query can be represented in relational algebra but it is inefficient because it duplicates values.

My last try (which does not compile and uses sub-query in where):

select *
from Customer C
where not exists
(select *
from (select Order_Id from orders O where O.Customer_Id = C.Customer_Id) S INNER JOIN order_items OI on S.Order_Id = OI.Order_Id
RIGHT OUTER JOIN (select Product_Id from product_info where category ='Computer') PI on PI.Product_Id = OI.Product_Id
where OI.Product_Id = null)

I read somewhere that in this case LATERAL could be used, but there is so little info about LATERAL that I could not get it right.

The exam is over but I am still interested about the solutions. Because it was 2 hour exam with 6 of this queries, ER diagram, ER-To-Relational, normalization to BCNF, 3NF, it comes to my mind how can this queries be so hard to solve. Am I missing something crucial here?

Here is small sample data that help me out little bit:

http://pastebin.com/DkCe0AGm

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Are you allowed to use divide in your relational algebra? –  Jodaka Jun 22 '12 at 15:30

2 Answers 2

This is very easy with a divide operator in relational algebra. You should note that just because anything you can write in relational algebra you can write in SQL, it does not mean that anything you can write in relational algebra you can write the same way in SQL. SQL does not have an easy equivalent of the divide operator, so trying to write this in SQL first won't help.

Since I don't know how to do greek letters on here, I'm just going to write some things out.

Sigma -> SELECT
Pi -> PROJECT
Rho -> RENAME

PROJECT c.Cust_First_Name, c.Cust_Last_Name, i.Product_ID (SELECT c.customer_id = o.customer_id, o.order_id = i.order_id (RENAME (Customer c) X RENAME (Orders o) X RENAME (Order_items i))) 
DIVIDE PROJECT p.product_id (SELECT p.category = 'Computers' (RENAME (Products p)))

If you type this into a LaTeX editor, you'll see it in its actual form:

\Pi_{c.cust\_last\_name, c.cust\_first\_name, i.product\_id} (\sigma_{c.customer\_id = o.customer\_id, o.order\_id = i.order\_id}(\rho_{c}(customer) X \rho_{o}(orders) X \rho_{i}(order\_items))) 
\div  \Pi_{p.product\_id}(\sigma_{p.category='computers'}(\rho_{p}(products)))

You could maybe argue that this is a subquery, but I would say it's just two different queries.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow thanks a lot for that divide operator. That was the key link that I was missing. –  user1377320 Jun 22 '12 at 17:53
    
You're right I did wrong by trying to find algorithm for converting the SQL query to relational algebra. I tried it on small example and I did figure out the following equivalence to divide operator: freeimagehosting.net/fdn5p –  user1377320 Jun 22 '12 at 18:02
    
Glad to help! On another note, remember that whenever you ask a question on StackOverflow, if someone provides a satisfactory answer, upvote and mark as correct - this helps not just the responder, but other people viewing your question. –  Jodaka Jun 22 '12 at 19:27
1  
I did try to up vote your post and mark as correct but when I click the arrow it says: "Vote Up requires 15 reputation" and I got only 11 reputation. Sorry about that. Regards. –  user1377320 Jun 23 '12 at 5:18
    
Well, you do get 2 reputation every time you mark an answer as correct. –  Jodaka Jun 23 '12 at 21:10

I find the question ambiguous. This version gets customers who only ordered products from the category computers:

select c.customer_id, c.Cust_First_Name, c.Cust_Last_Name
from Customer c join
     Orders o
     on c.customer_id = o.customer_id join
     Order_Item oi
     on o.order_Id = oi.order_id join
     Product_Info pi
     on oi.Product_id = pi.product_id
group by c.customer_id, c.Cust_First_Name, c.Cust_Last_Name
having min(case when pi.category = 'Computer' then 1 else 0 end) = 1

In this case, I'm just counting whether customers have any product not purchased in the category.

Another interpretation is "customers who ordered every product in the computer category":

select c.customer_id, c.Cust_First_Name, c.Cust_Last_Name
from Customer c join
     Orders o
     on c.customer_id = o.customer_id join
     Order_Item oi
     on o.order_Id = oi.order_id join
     Product_Info pi
     on pi.Product_id = oi.Product_id cross join
     (select count(distinct product_id) as cnt
      from Product_info pi
      where category = 'Computer'
     ) comps
where pi.Category = 'Computer'
group by c.customer_id, c.Cust_First_Name, c.Cust_Last_Name
having count(distinct product_id) = comps.cnt

In this case, the idea is to count the number of distinct products and see if the counts match.

I'm not sure if translating these to relational algebra actually helps form a good query.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. Actually your query is equivalent to my query in Try 3. It would form good query in relational algebra but unfortunately it is inefficient because it involves redundancy. –  user1377320 Jun 22 '12 at 18:04

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