Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I have a bash script that needs to take an arbitrary number of command line arguments and put them into a single string

Example of what the user would type in:

give <environment> <email> <any number of integers separated by spaces>
give testing stuff@things.com 1 2 3 4 5

I want to get all of the arguments from $3 to $# and concat them into a string.

My (probably awful) solution right now is

if [ $# -gt 3 ]
then
    env="env="$1
    email="email="$2
    entList=""

    for i in {3..$#}
    do
        if [ $i -eq 3 ]
            then
                    entList=$3
                    shift
            fi;
            if [ $i -gt 3 ]
            then
                    entList=$entList","$3
                   shift
            fi;
     done
fi;

I handle the case of having only three arguments a bit differently, and that one works fine.

Final value of $entList given the example give testing stuff@things.com 1 2 3 4 5 should be: 1,2,3,4,5

Right now when i run this i get the following Errors:

/usr/local/bin/ngive.sh: line 29: [: {3..5}: integer expression expected
/usr/local/bin/ngive.sh: line 34: [: {3..5}: integer expression expected

Lines 29 and 34 are:

line 29: if [ $i -eq 3 ]
line 34: if [ $i -gt 3 ]

Any help would be appreciated.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're on the right track. Here's my suggestion:

if [ $# -ge 3 ]; then

  env="$1"
  email="$2"
  entlist="$3"

  while shift && [ -n "$3" ]; do
    entlist="${entlist},$3"
  done

  echo "entlist=$entlist"

else

  echo "Arguments: $*"

fi

Note that variables should always be put inside quotes. I'm not sure why you were setting env=env=$1, but I suspect that if you want to recycle that value later, you should do it programatically rather than by evaluating the variable as if it were a statement, in case that was your plan.

share|improve this answer

Skip first three arguments using a subarray:

all=( ${@} )
IFS=','
threeplus="${all[*]:3}"
share|improve this answer
    
Just to be clear, the assignment to IFS and the quoted array with * as the subscript causes the first character of the contents of IFS to be output between each element of the array. –  Dennis Williamson Jun 22 '12 at 16:32

The reason you're getting those error messages is that in:

for i in {3..$#}

The brace expansion is performed before the parameter expansion and so the following if statement is evaluated as:

if [ {3..$#} -eq 3 ]

which isn't valid.

Change your for statement to use the C style:

for ((i = 3; i <= $#; i++))

Use this style for integer comparison:

if (( $# > 3 ))

and

if (( i == 3 ))

and

if (( i > 3 ))

Put your parameters inside the quotes:

env="env=$1"
email="email=$2"

and

entList="$entList,$3"

although the quotes aren't necessary since word splitting isn't performed on the right side of an assignment and you're not assigning special characters such as whitespace, semicolons, pipes, etc.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.