Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can two files be swapped in bash?

Or, can they be swapped in a shorter way than this:

cp old tmp
cp curr old
cp tmp curr
rm tmp
share|improve this question

13 Answers 13

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Add this to your .bashrc:

function swap()         
{
    local TMPFILE=tmp.$$
    mv "$1" $TMPFILE
    mv "$2" "$1"
    mv $TMPFILE "$2"
}
share|improve this answer
1  
if mv "$2" "$1" fails, how do you detect this and roll back? –  Michael Z Oct 2 '10 at 5:26
    
@Michael: If you are worried about that then you have options. You can print the name of the temporary file in the operation so that you can copy it back yourself. Or you could even create a .backup file of both in the directory. You have options. –  Robert Massaioli Jun 29 '11 at 13:50
2  
If you're creating the temporary file in the same directory as the source file then you could use ln instead of mv. For example ln "$1" "$tmp"; mv -f "$2" "$1"; mv "$tmp" "$2" this way if you need to roll back all you have to do is discard the temporary file, which is just a link to $1. It won't work for directories though (can't hard-link those). –  Haravikk Aug 4 '13 at 18:32
    
@Haravikk: Then $1 would be the same as $TMPFILE and copying $2 into $1 would copy it into both $1 and $TMPFILE, effectively losing the contents of $1. –  PSkocik Feb 3 at 1:59
    
No it won't; none of those commands touch the contents of the file, only swap around the file entries in the file-system. Try it yourself: cd /tmp; echo Foo > a.txt; echo Bar > b.txt; ln a.txt c.txt; mv -f b.txt a.txt; mv c.txt b.txt this will leave you with two files, a.txt (contents are now 'Bar') and b.txt (contents are now 'Foo'). Functionally it's not really any different to Hardy's answer, but with hard-links you can do a few other interesting things as well, if swapping isn't all you need, plus if you can't complete the swap you just discard c.txt –  Haravikk Feb 4 at 11:29
$ mv old tmp && mv curr old && mv tmp curr

is slightly more efficient!

share|improve this answer
11  
...and doesn't mv your files into nirvana, if there is a problem with tmp. +1 –  Boldewyn Jul 13 '09 at 11:36
tmpfile=$(mktemp $(dirname "$file1")/XXXXXX)
mv "$file1" "$tmpfile"
mv "$file2" "$file1"
mv "$tmpfile" "$file2"
share|improve this answer
    
Upmod for using mktemp –  Hasturkun Jul 12 '09 at 12:46
    
upmod for using the same filesystem –  Cougar Apr 6 '12 at 16:50

You could simply move them, instead of making a copy.

#!/bin/sh
# Created by Wojtek Jamrozy (www.wojtekrj.net)
mv $1 cop_$1
mv $2 $1
mv cop_$1 $2

http://www.wojtekrj.net/2008/08/bash-script-to-swap-contents-of-files/

share|improve this answer

do you actually want to swap them? i think its worth to mention that you can automatically backup overwritten file with mv:

mv new old -b

you'll get:

old and old~

if you'd like to have

old and old.old

you can use -S to change ~ to your custom suffix

mv new old -b -S .old
ls
old old.old

using this approach you can actually swap them faster, using only 2 mv:

mv new old -b && mv old~ new
share|improve this answer
1  
This looked promising but alas the -b option is not available on OS X Lion –  bloudermilk Jun 2 '12 at 23:10

using mv means you have one fewer operations, no need for the final rm, also mv is only changing directory entries so you are not using extra disk space for the copy.

Temptationh then is to implementat a shell function swap() or some such. If you do be extremly careful to check error codes. Could be horribly destructive. Also need to check for pre-existing tmp file.

share|improve this answer

Combining the best answers, I put this in my ~/.bashrc:

function swap()
{
  tmpfile=$(mktemp $(dirname "$1")/XXXXXX)
  mv "$1" "$tmpfile" && mv "$2" "$1" &&  mv "$tmpfile" "$2"
}
share|improve this answer

Hardy's idea was good enough for me. So I've tried my following two files to swap "sendsms.properties", "sendsms.properties.swap". But once I called this function as same argument "sendsms.properties" then this file deleted. Avoiding to this kind of FAIL I added some line for me :-)

function swp2file()
{   if [ $1 != $2 ] ; then
    local TMPFILE=tmp.$$
    mv "$1" $TMPFILE
    mv "$2" "$1"
    mv $TMPFILE "$2"
    else
    echo "swap requires 2 different filename"
    fi
}

Thanks again Hardy ;-)

share|improve this answer

One problem I had when using any of the solutions provided here: your file names will get switched up.

I incorporated the use of basename and dirname to keep the file names intact*.

swap() {
    if (( $# == 2 )); then
        mv "$1" /tmp/
        mv "$2" "`dirname $1`"
        mv "/tmp/`basename $1`" "`dirname $2`"
    else
        echo "Usage: swap <file1> <file2>"
        return 1
    fi
}

I've tested this in bash and zsh.


*So to clarify how this is better:

If you start out with:

dir1/file2: this is file2
dir2/file1: this is file1

The other solutions would end up with:

dir1/file2: this is file1
dir2/file1: this is file2

The contents are swapped but the file names stayed. My solution makes it:

dir1/file1: this is file1
dir2/file2: this is file2

The contents and names are swapped.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice.. But it does not work if the files are in the same directory.. (I suppose, in that case, the only thing that makes sense is to swap the contents of the files, but keep the file names :) ) –  Håkon Hægland Jun 14 '13 at 22:24
    
@HåkonHægland it should work if they are in the same directory. The only caveat is if they are both in /tmp, in which case you can just change the script to move them to /tmp/foo or something –  adam_0 Aug 9 '13 at 15:28

A somewhat hardened version that works for both files and directories:

function swap()
{
  if [ ! -z "$2" ] && [ -e "$1" ] && [ -e "$2" ] && ! [ "$1" -ef "$2" ] && (([ -f "$1" ] && [ -f "$2" ]) || ([ -d "$1" ] && [ -d "$2" ])) ; then
    tmp=$(mktemp -d $(dirname "$1")/XXXXXX)
    mv "$1" "$tmp" && mv "$2" "$1" &&  mv "$tmp"/"$1" "$2"
    rmdir "$tmp"
  else
    echo "Usage: swap file1 file2 or swap dir1 dir2"
  fi
}

This works on Linux. Not sure about OS X.

share|improve this answer

Surely mv instead of cp?

share|improve this answer
    
! Think if old is of 10GB File –  shahjapan Jun 4 '13 at 10:29
mv old tmp
mv curr old
mv tmp curr
share|improve this answer

I have this in a working script I delivered. It's written as a function, but you would invoke it

d_swap lfile rfile

The GNU mv has the -b and the -T switch. You can deal with directories using the -T switch.

The quotes are for filenames with spaces.

It's a bit verbose, but I've used it many times with both files and directories. There might be cases where you would want to rename a file with the name a directory had, but that isn't handled by this function.

This isn't very efficient if all you want to do is rename the files (leaving them where they are), that is better done with a shell variable.

d_swap() {
 test $# -eq 2 || return 2

 test -e "$1" || return 3
 test -e "$2" || return 3

 if [ -f "$1" -a -f "$2" ]
 then
    mv -b "$1" "$2" && mv "$2"~ "$1"
    return 0
 fi

 if [ -d "$1" -a -d "$2" ]
 then
    mv -T -b "$1" "$2" && mv -T "$2"~ "$1"
    return 0
 fi

 return 4
}

This function will rename files. It uses a temp name (it puts a dot '.' in front of the name) just in case the files/directories are in the same directory, which is usually the case.

d_swapnames() {
    test $# -eq 2 || return 2

    test -e "$1" || return 3
    test -e "$2" || return 3

    local lname="$(basename "$1")"
    local rname="$(basename "$2")"

    ( cd "$(dirname "$1")" && mv -T "$lname" ".${rname}" ) && \
    ( cd "$(dirname "$2")" && mv -T "$rname" "$lname" ) && \
    ( cd "$(dirname "$1")" && mv -T ".${rname}" "$rname" )
}

That is a lot faster (there's no copying, just renaming). It is even uglier. And it will rename anything: files, directories, pipes, devices.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.