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This is the code (Euclid's algorithm for GCD). Of course there is Prelude.gcd but as an exercise I am implementing my own.

selfGCD :: Integral f => f -> f -> f  
selfGCD a b = if b == 0 then
        return a
    else 
        return (selfGCD a (mod a b))

Using ghci, I get the following error:

two.hs:32:25:  
Couldn't match type `f' with `m0 f'  
  `f' is a rigid type variable bound by  
      the type signature for selfGCD :: Integral f => f -> f -> f  
      at two.hs:31:1  
In the return type of a call of `return'  
In the expression: return a  
In the expression:  
  if b == 0 then return a else return (selfGCD a (mod a b))  

two.hs:34:25:  
Couldn't match type `f' with `m1 f'  
  `f' is a rigid type variable bound by  
      the type signature for selfGCD :: Integral f => f -> f -> f  
      at two.hs:31:1  
In the return type of a call of `return'  
In the expression: return (selfGCD a (mod a b))  
In the expression:  
  if b == 0 then return a else return (selfGCD a (mod a b))  

How can I rectify the problem?

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Note there's an implementation error. Once the call to return is removed, selfGCD a b will always result in a. –  outis Jun 23 '12 at 22:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Drop the returns.

In Haskell, return is a function of type

return :: Monad m => a -> m a

and not the return operator you know from imperative languages.

Thus with the returns, the implementation has type

selfGCD :: (Integral a, Monad m) => a -> a -> m a

contrary to the type signature.

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1  
Might want to mention that in Haskell there is no real distinction between a function and what it returns. A function returns a definition/a definition is a function. The name is merely a convenient label by which to refer to a definition; just like a named constant in imperative languages is merely a convenient label to refer to that constant value. –  user268396 Jun 22 '12 at 15:32
    
Why 11 minutes wait to accept it as correct? It is already correct (at least it is working as expected). –  WeaklyTyped Jun 22 '12 at 15:32
    
I think the logic there is to give at least a little bit of time for alternative answers as well as more comments and edits on the main answer. –  Tikhon Jelvis Jun 22 '12 at 21:14

First of all, don't use return. In Haskell, it doesn't do what you think it does. Second of all, your arguments for calling gcd again are swapped. It should be selfGCD b (mod a b)

See the edited code below which works as expected of a GCD algorithm.

selfGCD :: Integral f => f -> f -> f  
selfGCD a b = if b == 0 then a else selfGCD b (mod a b)
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Ah! That is a typo. Thanks! –  WeaklyTyped Jun 22 '12 at 15:36

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