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I am having trouble understanding the concept of getters and setters in the C# language. In languages like Objective-C, they seem an integral part of the system, but not so much in C# (as far as I can tell). I have read books and articles already, so my question is, to those of you who understand getters & setters in C#, what example would you personally use if you were teaching the concept to a complete beginner (this would include as few lines of code as possible)?

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This is pretty broad. What specifically is giving you trouble with C# properties? –  arcain Jun 22 '12 at 15:39
    
This is probably a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1209359/properties-and-methods –  arcain Jun 22 '12 at 15:41
    
I wonder what is missing at getters/setters in C# in comparison to Objective C? –  Vlad Jun 22 '12 at 15:41
    
Everybody learns differently, and in this case broadness may be an advantage because if each experienced coder gives an example in the way that makes sense to them, then hopefully at least one answer will make sense to each reader. I will check out this possible duplicate in a second. I know very little Obj-C other than what I was able to teach myself, but it seemed like you had to get and set everything, whereas in C# I've never had to do so... –  CM90 Jun 22 '12 at 15:53
    
@CM90: actually, you can have the usual variables (without getters/setters) in Objective C, especially in the parts not interacting with Cocoa. –  Vlad Jun 22 '12 at 16:06

10 Answers 10

I think a bit of code will help illustrate what setters and getters are:

public class Foo
{
   private string bar;

   public string GetBar()
   {
       return bar;
   }

   public void SetBar(string value)
   {
       bar = value;
   }
}

In this example we have a private member of the class that is called bar. The GetBar and SetBar methods do exactly what they are named - one retrieves the bar member, and the other sets its value.

In c# 1.1 + you have properties. The basic functionality is also the same:

public class Foo
{
    private string bar;

    public string Bar
    {
        get { return bar; }
        set { bar = value; }
    }
}

The private member bar is not accessible outside the class. However the public "Bar" is, and it has two accessors - get, which just as the example above "GetBar()" returns the private member, and also a set - which corresponds to the SetBar(string value) method in the forementioned example.

Starting with C# 3.0 and above the compiler became optimized to the point where such properties do not need to have the private member as their source. The compiler automatically generates a private member of that type and uses it as a source of a property.

public class Foo
{
   public string Bar { get; set; }
}

what the code shows is an automatic property that has a private member generated by the compiler. You don't see the private member but it is there. This also introduced a couple of other issues - mainly with access control. In C# 1.1, and 2.0 you could omit the get or set portion of a property:

public class Foo
{
    private string bar;

    public string Bar
    {
        get{ return bar; }
    }
}

Giving you the chance to restrict how other objects interact with the "Bar" property of the Foo class. Starting with C# 3.0 and above - if you chose to use automatic properties you would have to specify the access to the property as follows:

public class Foo
{
    public string Bar { get; private set; }
}

What that means is that only the class itself can set Bar to some value, however anyone could read the value in Bar.

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In C#, Properties represent your Getters and Setters.

Here's an example:

public class PropertyExample
{
    private int myIntField = 0;

    public int MyInt
    {
        // This is your getter.
        // it uses the accessibility of the property (public)
        get
        {
            return myIntField;
        }
        // this is your setter
        // Note: you can specifiy different accessibility
        // for your getter and setter.
        protected set
        {
            // You can put logic into your getters and setters
            // since they actually map to functions behind the scenes
            DoSomeValidation(value)
            {
                // The input of the setter is always called "value"
                // and is of the same type as your property definition
                myIntField = value;
            }
        }
    }
}

You would access this property just like a field. For example:

PropertyExample example = new PropertyExample();
example.MyInt = 4; // sets myIntField to 4
Console.WriteLine( example.MyInt ); // prints 4

A few other things to note: 1) You don't have to specifiy both a getter and a setter, you can omit either one.

2) Properties are just "syntactic sugar" for your traditional getter and setter. The compiler will actually build get_ and set_ functions behind the scenes (in the compiled IL) and map all references to your property to those functions.

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Simple example

    public  class Simple
    {
        public int Propery { get; set; }
    }
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As far as I understand getters and setters are to improve encapsulation. There is nothing complex about them in C#.

You define a property of on object like this:

int m_colorValue = 0;
public int Color 
{
   set { m_colorValue = value; }
   get { return m_colorValue; }
}

This is the most simple use. It basically sets an internal variable or retrieves its value. You use a Property like this:

someObject.Color = 222; // sets a color 222
int color = someObject.Color // gets the color of the object

You could eventually do some processing on the value in the setters or getters like this:

public int Color 
{
   set { m_colorValue = value + 5; }
   get { return m_colorValue  - 30; }
}

if you skip set or get, your property will be read or write only. That's how I understand the stuff.

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C# introduces properties which do most of the heavy lifting for you...

ie

public string Name { get; set; }

is a C# shortcut to writing...

private string _name;

public getName { return _name; }
public setName(string value) { _name = value; }

Basically getters and setters are just means of helping encapsulation. When you make a class you have several class variables that perhaps you want to expose to other classes to allow them to get a glimpse of some of the data you store. While just making the variables public to begin with may seem like an acceptable alternative, in the long run you will regret letting other classes manipulate your classes member variables directly. If you force them to do it through a setter, you can add logic to ensure no strange values ever occur, and you can always change that logic in the future without effecting things already manipulating this class.

ie

private string _name;

public getName { return _name; }
public setName(string value) 
{ 
    //Don't want things setting my Name to null
    if (value == null) 
    {
        throw new InvalidInputException(); 
    }
    _name = value; 
}
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silent ignoring the setter in the case of bad input is usually a bad idea –  Vlad Jun 22 '12 at 16:03
    
Probably ok for a simple example, but I edited in an exception rather than a silent ignore. –  Kevin DiTraglia Jun 22 '12 at 16:07

My explanation would be following. (It's not so short, but it's quite simple.)


Imagine a class with a variable:

class Something
{
    int weight;
    // and other methods, of course, not shown here
}

Well, there is a small problem with this class: no one can see the weight. We could make weight public, but then everyone would be able to change the weight at any moment (which is perhaps not what we want). So, well, we can do a function:

class Something
{
    int weight;
    public int GetWeight() { return weight; }
    // and other methods
}

This is already better, but now everyone instead of plain something.Weight has to type something.GetWeight(), which is, well, ugly.

With properties, we can do the same, but the code stays clean:

class Something
{
    public int weight { get; private set; }
    // and other methods
}

int w = something.weight // works!
something.weight = x; // doesn't even compile

Nice, so with the properties we have finer control over the variable access.

Another problem: okay, we want the outer code to be able to set weight, but we'd like to control its value, and not allow the weights lower than 100. Moreover, there are is some other inner variable density, which depends on weight, so we'd want to recalculate the density as soon as the weight changes.

This is traditionally achieved in the following way:

class Something
{
    int weight;
    public int SetWeight(int w)
    {
        if (w > 100)
            throw new ArgumentException("weight too small");
        weight = w;
        RecalculateDensity();
    }
    // and other methods
}

something.SetWeight(anotherSomething.GetWeight() + 1);

But again, we don't want expose to our clients that setting the weight is a complicated operation, it's semantically nothing but assigning a new weight. So the code with a setter looks the same way, but nicer:

class Something
{
    private int _w;
    public int Weight
    {
        get { return _w; }
        set
        {
            if (value > 100)
                throw new ArgumentException("weight too small");
            _w = value;
            RecalculateDensity();
        }
    }
    // and other methods
}

something.Weight = otherSomething.Weight + 1; // much cleaner, right?

So, no doubt, properties are "just" a syntactic sugar. But it makes the client's code be better. Interestingly, the need for property-like things arises very often, you can check how often you find the functions like GetXXX() and SetXXX() in the other languages.

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this is a superb example for my learning style –  CM90 Jun 22 '12 at 16:17
1  
@CM90: thanks! :) –  Vlad Jun 25 '12 at 13:40
    
Really Nice Explanation :) –  Crazy Programmer Feb 12 at 10:14

Most languages do it this way, and you can do it in C# too.

    public void setRAM(int RAM)
    {
        this.RAM = RAM;
    }
    public int getRAM()
    {
        return this.RAM;
    }

But C# also gives a more elegant solution to this :

    public class Computer
    {
        int ram;
        public int RAM { 
             get {
                  return ram;
                 }
             set {
                  ram = value; // value is a reserved name and it is a variable that holds the input that is given to RAM ( like in the example bellow )
                 }
        }
     }

And later access it with.

    Computer comp = new Computer();
    com.RAM = 1024;
    int var = com.RAM;

For newer versions of C# it's even better :

public class Computer
{
    public int RAM { get; set; }
}

and later :

Computer comp = new Computer();
com.RAM = 1024;
int var = comp.RAM;
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Internally, getters and setters are just methods. When C# compiles, it generates methods for your getters and setters like this, for example:

public int get_MyProperty() { ... }
public void set_MyProperty(int value) { ... }

C# allows you to declare these methods using a short-hand syntax. The line below will be compiled into the methods above when you build your application.

public int MyProperty { get; set; }

or

private int myProperty;
public int MyProperty 
{ 
    get { return myProperty; }
    set { myProperty = value; } // value is an implicit parameter containing the value being assigned to the property.
}
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Getters and Setters in C# are something that simplifies the code.

private string name = "spots";

public string Name
{
    get { return name; }
    set { name = value; }
}

And calling it (assume we have a person obj with a name property):

Console.WriteLine(Person.Name); //prints "spots"
Person.Name = "stops";
Console.Writeline(Person.Name); //prints "stops"

This simplifies your code. Where in Java you might have to have two methods, one to Get() and one to Set() the property, in C# it is all done in one spot. I usually do this at the start of my classes:

public string foobar {get; set;}

This creates a getter and setter for my foobar property. Calling it is the same way as shown before. Somethings to note are that you don't have to include both get and set. If you don't want the property being modified, don't include set!

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This would be a get/set in C# using the smallest amount of code possible. You get auto-implemented properties in C# 3.0+.

public class Contact
{
   public string Name { get; set; }
}
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