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To make c++ STL algorithms such as for_each work with more arguments, overloading works here:

    template<typename II1, typename II2, typename F>
F for_each( II1 _ii1, II1 ii1_, II2 _ii2, F f )
{
    while ( _ii1 != ii1_ )
    { f( *_ii1++, *_ii2++ ); }

    return f;
}

template<typename II1, typename II2, typename II3, typename F>
F for_each( II1 _ii1, II1 ii1_, II2 _ii2, II3 _ii3, F f )
{
    while ( _ii1 != ii1_ )
    { f( *_ii1++, *_ii2++, *_ii3++ ); }

    return f;
}

template<typename II1, typename II2, typename II3, typename II4, typename F>
F for_each( II1 _ii1, II1 ii1_, II2 _ii2, II3 _ii3, II4 _ii4, F f )
{
    while ( _ii1 != ii1_ )
    { f( *_ii1++, *_ii2++, *_ii3++, *_ii4++ ); }

    return f;
}

But is there a way to implement this kind of functions using variadic template?

I can only make it work this way

void increase(){}

template< typename II1, typename ... IIn >
void increase( II1& _ii1, IIn& ... _iin )
{
    ++_ii1;

    increase( _iin... );
}

template<typename F, typename II1, typename ... IIn >
F for_each( F f, II1 _ii1, II1 ii1_, IIn ... _iin )
{
    while ( _ii1 != ii1_ )
    {
        f( *_ii1, *_iin ... );
        increase( _ii1, _iin... );
    }

    return f;
}

#include <iostream>
int main()
{
    int A[10];
    int B[10];
    int i = 0;
    for_each( [&i]( int & v ) { v = i++; }, A, A+10 );
    for_each( []( int a, int & b ) { b = a; }, A, A+10, B );

    for ( int i = 0; i != 10; ++i )
    { std::cout << A[i] << "\t" << B[i] << "\n"; }

    return 0;
}

which is very ugly.

Edit:(Fri Jun 22 21:12:28 CEST 2012)

To work with this, I have to write code like this:

for_each( function, begin1, end1, begin2, begin3 );

while stl's way is prefered:

for_each( begin1, end1, begin2, begin3, function );

Edit:(Fri Jun 22 23:55:27 CEST 2012)

With @Hurkyl 's help, now I have these code working:

namespace for_each_impl_private
{
template< typename F, typename InputIterator1, typename ... InputIteratorn >
F _for_each( F f, InputIterator1 begin1, InputIterator1 end1, InputIteratorn ... beginn )
{
    while ( begin1 != end1 )
        f( *begin1++, *beginn++... );
    return f;
}

struct dummy {};

template< typename S, typename ... T >
void rotate_then_impl( S s, T ... t )
{
    rotate_then_impl( t..., s );
}

template< typename S, typename ... T>
void rotate_then_impl( S s, dummy, T ... t )
{
    _for_each( s, t... );
}

}//namespace for_each_impl_private
template< typename ... T >
void for_each( T ... t )
{
    static_assert( sizeof ... ( t ) > 2, "for_each requires at least 3 arguments" );
    for_each_impl_private::rotate_then_impl( t..., for_each_impl_private::dummy() );
}

#include <iostream>
int main()
{
    int A[10];
    int B[10];
    int i = 0;
    for_each( A, A + 10, [&i]( int & v ) { v = i++; } );
    for_each( A, A + 10, B, []( int a, int & b ) { b = a; } );
    for_each( A, A + 10, B, []( int a, int b ) { std::cout << a << "\t" << b << "\n"; } );

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
7  
Choose meaningful and sensible names for your parameters (function parameters as well as template parameters). – Nawaz Jun 22 '12 at 15:54
1  
Have you considered using one container of aggregates instead of multiple containers of base elements? – Mark B Jun 22 '12 at 17:14

You can expand not parameters itself, but expressions, like you did here

*_iin ... 

It means

for each _iin_k from _iin perform dereference and put result of operation to function

But you can use every expression here, so you can write

*_iin++...
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. But the problem with the example I presented is that it does not allow similar interfaces like stl's for_each: I will have to write "for_each( function, begin1, end1, begin2)" to make it work, while "for_each( begin1, end1, begin2, function)" is expected. – Feng Wang Jun 22 '12 at 19:11

I don't have a compiler handy to test this, but you should be able to do something like the following:

class dummy {};

template< typename S, typename T...>
void inner_func(S s, T... t);

template< typename S, typename T...>
void rotate(S s, T... t)
{
    rotate(t..., s);
}

template< typename S, typename T...>
void rotate(S s, dummy, T... t)
{
    inner_func(s, t...);
}

template< typename T...>
void outer_func(T... t)
{
   rotate(t..., dummy());
}

Basically, you enact a rotate the arguments one place to the right by repeatedly rotating left. However, you should probably do something else. For example,

auto i = zip(i1_start, i2, i3, i4, i5);
for_each(i, i.end(i1_end), unzipper(function));

This would let you use the ordinary for_each, and you could reuse zip and unzipper for other purposes. Possibly even better, write something that lets you do this:

for(auto &x : zip_view(i1_start, i1_end, i2, i3, i4, i5) {
    unzip(function, x);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This helps a lot, thank you very much. – Feng Wang Jun 22 '12 at 21:52

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