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I'm trying to make this regex ^(?!\-\-\sRoaming) to match with -- Roaming but it doesnt. Am I matching correctly the white space between -- and Roaming ?

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this, which won't match if -- Roaming is anywhere in the input:

^(?!.*--\sRoaming)


Note that you don't need to escape the hyphens.

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Sorry, it has to match to everything but not if -- Roaming is present, that is why it had !. But your regex is working for matching, how do I convert it to not to match if -- Roaming is present but do match if anything else is? –  BoDiE2003 Jun 22 '12 at 17:22
    
See edited answer. –  Bohemian Jun 22 '12 at 17:25
    
Thank you, works like charm. –  BoDiE2003 Jun 22 '12 at 17:34
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Yes you are correctly matching that portion of the Regex. I am a little hazy on Regex but what does the ?! mean? I tried the \-\-\sRoaming part in http://regexpal.com/ and it was working correctly.

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I can expect more words after -- Roaming, for example: -- Roaming is present but I need only to match if -- Roaming pattern is present. –  BoDiE2003 Jun 22 '12 at 16:30
    
You can put a $ at the end to stop this from happening. $ is end of line identifier. This may be the opposite of what you want. Do you want to match when there are extra words or not? –  Dave Jun 22 '12 at 16:33
    
\-\-\sRoaming$ is NOT matching with -- Roaming blah and it should. Thank you for your time by the way. –  BoDiE2003 Jun 22 '12 at 16:36
    
Yeah okay, that's what I thought. the $ would definitely not match "-- Roaming blah" since $ means that the end of line must be next. What is the ?! for? \-\-\sRoaming definitely matches -- Roaming, so by process of elimination it seems like this would be the issue... Also, the ^ at the beginning means that it must be at the beginning of a line. Do you want this behavior? –  Dave Jun 22 '12 at 16:39
    
Yes -- Roaming is always at the beggining of the line, but its not the only word, it might has some stuff behind. –  BoDiE2003 Jun 22 '12 at 17:16
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The space is correct. But why wouldnt --\sRoaming work for you?

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Because I can expect more words after -- Roaming, for example: -- Roaming is present but I need only to match if -- Roaming pattern is present. –  BoDiE2003 Jun 22 '12 at 16:30
    
It has to go through a firewall rule for a particular brand that matches only by regularexp on what we need. –  BoDiE2003 Jun 22 '12 at 16:37
    
Yes, but it doesnt work for -- Roaming is present (for example), because -- Roaming will always have something behind –  BoDiE2003 Jun 22 '12 at 17:20
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