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Here is the code:

class Class1
{    
    private Class2 object;

    public Class1(Class2 obj) : this(obj.ToString())
    {
        this.object = obj;
    }
}

More specifically, what does the : this part do.

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3  
Why the downvotes? This is a valid question for somebody new to development. –  Darren Young Jun 22 '12 at 16:33
1  
Run the code, then you'll know. –  Anthony Pegram Jun 22 '12 at 16:34
3  
Clearly you haven't made a single search on to find the answer. This can be found in the simplest articles on MSDN about C#. –  marceln Jun 22 '12 at 16:34
1  
It's not always easy to search for things with non-alphanumeric characters like : I think this is a good question. –  Nathan Jun 22 '12 at 16:37
2  
It's not a good question because Stackoverflow should not be used as a substitute for a book/tutorial/class/etc. This is elementary C# knowledge and is inappropriate for this site. Might as well ask the question, "What does * do in C#?" –  Kirk Woll Jun 22 '12 at 16:40
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The :this(obj.ToString) causes the constructor code for the constructor defined taking a string parameter to run first. Once it runs, then the constructor code (setting this.object = obj) is executed.

This is covered in MSDN's page on Constructors (the last example set).

Note that, in your code above, as written, this will cause a compiler error. You would also need to have a constructor like the following:

public Class1(string str) // Constructor taking a string, though it could be non-public
{
    // Do something with str
}

With this constructor in place, it will get called, perform it's initialization steps, then the first constructor (which sets this.object) will run.

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Thank you, makes sense now! –  devcoder Jun 22 '12 at 16:39
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: this(obj.ToString()) calls overloaded version of constructor from same class.

It means that somewhere in this class you have another constructor which takes string as parameter and will be executed alongside current constructor.

class A
{
    public A(Class2 obj): this(obj.ToString()) // execute A(string text)
    {
        // your code
    }

    public A(string text)
    {
       // your code
    }
}
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Class 1 will have another constructor that takes a string parameter.

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It calls the constructor that matches that syntax. In your case, I'm assuming there's a constructor that takes a string argument somewhere:

public Class1(string s)
{ 
}
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