Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've seen countless questions of the form "I don't like padding how do I turn it off", but have yet to find anything about forcing the compiler to provide extra padding.

The specific case that I have looks like

struct particle{
  vect2 s;
  vect2 v;
  int rX;
  int rY;
  double mass;
  int boxNum;
};

Where vect2 is a simple struct {double x; double y;} vect2. In order to use SSE2, I need to be able to load a pair of doubles, aligned to 16 byte boundaries. This used to work, until I added the extra int, pushing my struct size from 48 bytes to 56 bytes. The result is segfaults.

Is there some kind of compiler directive I can use that either says "pad this struct to make it a multiple of 16 bytes long", or "this struct has an alignment of 16-bytes"? I know I could do it manually (tacking on an extra char[12], for example), but I'd really rather just tell the compiler(GCC, preferably ICC compatible), and not have to do it manually if I change the struct in future.

share|improve this question
7  
In C++11 there is now alignas for this purpose. –  ildjarn Jun 22 '12 at 16:43
    
I don't think GCC has implemented this yet, though. –  chris Jun 22 '12 at 16:43
2  
    
Could you union your vect2 with __m128? That should instruct gcc to align your struct to 16 bytes on the stack. –  ecatmur Jun 22 '12 at 16:50
    
I actually had it as a union with the __m128d, though I removed it for reasons of being told it was a terrible idea in terms of the resulting generated code, and that _mm_load_pd() should be used instead. Just using that for alignment could work though. –  zebediah49 Jun 22 '12 at 16:52
show 2 more comments

5 Answers

You can nest two structures to pad it automatically without needing to keep track of the size yourself.

struct particle
{
    // ...
};

{
    particle p;
    char padding[16-(sizeof(particle)%16)];
};

This version unfortunately adds 16 bytes if the structure is already a multiple of 16. It's unavoidable because the standard doesn't allow arrays of zero length.

Some compilers do allow zero length arrays as an extension, and in that case you can do this instead:

struct particle_wrapper
{
    particle p;
    char padding[sizeof(particle)%16 ? 16-(sizeof(particle)%16) : 0];
};

This version does not add any bytes of padding if the structure is already a multiple of 16.

share|improve this answer
1  
You can avoid adding 16 bytes by doing char padding[ (sizeof(particle) + 15) & ~15 ]. –  Pedro Jun 23 '12 at 18:31
    
@Pedro, I don't think that's quite right. –  Mark Ransom Jun 23 '12 at 20:13
1  
It is, but only works because 16 is a power of 2. It's easier to understand if you consider that ~15 is 1..10000 in binary, i.e. it filters out the last four bits, leaving a multiple of 16. Since this just truncates the number to a multiple of 16, we have to add 15 first so that we get the next-highest multiple. –  Pedro Jun 23 '12 at 20:44
    
@Pedro, consider if sizeof(particle) == 1 - your padding will be 16 bytes, leading to a total size of 17 bytes. I think you meant 15 instead of ~15, but even that's not right because it would add only 1 byte instead of 15. %16 and &15 are identical operations. You need to add the inverse of the size of the struct, which is what I did with 16-.... –  Mark Ransom Jun 24 '12 at 3:00
    
Sorry, I forgot to subtract the actual size of the struct. The correct declaration is char padding[ ((sizeof(particle) + 15) & ~15) - sizeof(particle)]. In any case, this is all moot since, in gcc, adding __attribute__((aligned(16))) at the end of the struct declaration does this automatically. –  Pedro Jun 24 '12 at 15:17
show 3 more comments
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm adding my own answer to this, in case someone comes looking for a solution. Mark's solution is a neat one, and fulfills the automatic requirement, but it is not when I ended up going with. I wanted to avoid this, which is why I asked the question, but there is a "trivial" solution:

struct particle{
  vect2 s;
  vect2 v;
  int rX;
  int rY;
  double mass;
  int boxNum;
  char padding[12];
};

By manually checking the current size of the struct, you can add an appropriate number of chars, (or anything else, but char's let you do it in bytes), to make it the right size. This showed the best performance, as well as simplicity, even though it does require updating every time the struct changes. In this case that is fine, although if you had a struct that could change size depending on options, that would be problematic.

Note that my struct was 56 bytes, and I added 12 to make it 64. That math doesn't work, because the trailing int was already being padded out by 4 bytes to the 8-byte boundary; the struct was actually only 52 bytes before. Adding only 5 chars would have worked, by making the struct 57 bytes long, which would have been padded out to 64, but that is not as nice a solution, which is why I used 12 to make it work out exactly.

share|improve this answer
4  
That seems sensible given the performance requirements; for the sake of your coworkers and future maintainers (including your future self) please comment the fix and add a compile time assert that the struct is a multiple of 16 bytes in size. –  ecatmur Jun 24 '12 at 22:18
    
Thanks, that's a very good point. –  zebediah49 Jun 25 '12 at 2:16
1  
Is there any particular reason why you didn't want to leave this to the compiler, e.g. with __attribute__((aligned(16)))? –  Pedro Jun 27 '12 at 9:45
add comment

In gcc, you can align arbitrary types and variables with __attribute__((aligned(...))). For your example, this would be

struct particle{
  vect2 s;
  vect2 v;
  int rX;
  int rY;
  double mass;
  int boxNum;
} __attribute__((aligned (16)));

This automagically padds the struct so that arrays thereof will be correctly aligned.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not tested, but this might work:

#include <xmmintrin.h>

struct particle{
  union {
    vect2 s;
    __m128 s_for_alignment;
  };
  union {
    vect2 v;
    __m128 v_for_alignment;
  };
  ...
};

I know that gcc had issues aligning __m128 correctly previously, but those should be fixed by now.

share|improve this answer
    
In that case I might as well go with union vect2 { __m128d s; struct{ double x; double y;};};, but yes, that might be the way to go. –  zebediah49 Jun 22 '12 at 16:54
    
Testing indicates that this works about 10% slower than manually padding; I'm not entirely sure why. –  zebediah49 Jun 22 '12 at 17:00
    
Crazy. Any differences in the generated asm? –  ecatmur Jun 22 '12 at 17:01
    
Reading ASM isn't my strong suit, but when I turn on the union (also padded the struct so that I was only benchmarking one change, the number of instructions recorded by Callgrind went from 11G to 13G. Comparing one of the slow sections, I notice 20 instead of 10 instructions in the loop: It goes from movsd{3}, addsd{2}, movsd{2}, ucomisd, jbe to mov, movsd, mov{8}, addsd, mov{3}, movsd, addsd, movsd, ucomisd, movsdjbe. Most of the movs appear to be shuffling things around with %rdx, %rax, and 0x??(%rsp). –  zebediah49 Jun 22 '12 at 17:32
add comment

The new C++11 spec also has a new feature for this, though I do not believe many vendors have been implemented them yet.

You can try the pack pragma, though it is not supported by the spec. Both GCC and MS support it though.

This aligns the struct on 1 byte boundaries, though you can change the number to anything you want.

#pragma pack(push,1)
// ...
#pragma pack(pop)

update:

So apparently the above will not work as it only shrinks padding, never expanding it. Regretfully, I don't have a testing environment this afternoon.

Maybe using an anonymous union would work. I know it will expand to the largest size, though I don't know if you get any guarantees about alignment otherwise.

template<typename T, size_t padding_size>
  struct padded_field {
    union {
      T value;
      uint8_t padding[padding_size];
    };
  };
share|improve this answer
3  
I tried that; when set to 4, it squishes down to 52 bytes.. but when set to 16, it stays at 56, so I assumed that it doesn't expand the padding, only force tighter packing. –  zebediah49 Jun 22 '12 at 16:48
1  
I am unfamiliar with gcc's implementation, but per the Visual C++ documentation, "The alignment of a member will be on a boundary that is either a multiple of n or a multiple of the size of the member, whichever is smaller." –  James McNellis Jun 22 '12 at 16:50
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.