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I'm new to Java (I'm using Java 6). I've been using the below design pattern for all my Java POJOs and servlets to access an Oracle 11G database via GlassFish 3.1.2 web server.

I'm getting an intermittent database error (ORA-12519) when all available processes (or sessions, not sure what the difference is) are consumed, leading me to think somehow the processes are not being released by the application.

Looking at the design pattern below, is there a better way to make sure that the JDBC connection to the database is released in the event of an exception? For example, should I also place the if ( conn != null) conn.close(); code INSIDE the catch block? Or, is there a better design pattern? Thanks in advance for any comments/hints.

public String MyFunction() throws Exception {     

    Connection conn;
    CallableStatement cs;

  try {

      Context context = new InitialContext();
      DataSource ds = (DataSource)context.lookup("jdbc/MyPool");
      conn = ds.getConnection();        

      cs = conn.prepareCall( "{call my_sproc (?)}" );

      cs.registerOutParameter(1, Types.VARCHAR);

      cs.execute();

      String outParam = cs.getString(1); 

      if ( conn != null )  // close connection
         conn.close();

  } catch (Exception e) {
      outParam = "an error occurred";
  }
    return outparam;
}
share|improve this question
    
Note that it may also be good practice to close resultsets and statements. Here's a useful link (see Stefan Schweizer's reply in the link for good design pattern): stackoverflow.com/questions/103938/… –  ggkmath Jun 22 '12 at 17:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted
if ( conn != null )  // close connection
         conn.close();

At this line conn cannot be null. The most popular pattern, up until Java 6 is:

Connection conn = null;
try {
   // initialize connection
   // use connection 
} catch {
  // handle exception
} finally {
  if (conn != null) {
     try { conn.close(); } catch (Exception e) { /* handle close exception, quite usually ignore */ } 
     }
}

With Java 7 this will become less cumbersome with its try-with-resource construct. The above code can change to the much shorter

try (Connection conn  = createConnection()) {
    // use connection 
} catch {
    // handle exception
}
// close is not required to be called explicitly
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks Miserable Variable, when you say "up until Java 6" do you mean "up to and including Java 6" (that's what I'm using)? I assume so. Also, when you say "quite usually ignored", are you refering to only the try...catch within the finally block (that is, the if (conn != null) conn.close(); is always there, right?)? Why do people usually ignore handling the exception in the finally block for closing the connection? –  ggkmath Jun 22 '12 at 16:57
    
Yes, exceptions from connection.close() are often ignored or at most logged but not handled in any other way:) I don't know why; I have never actually seen a close throwing an exception. –  Miserable Variable Jun 22 '12 at 16:59
    
OK, I'll probably log it, thanks! –  ggkmath Jun 22 '12 at 17:00
    
Just to be clear, since finally executes no matter what, I don't need to close the connection inside the try block right? I can just close the connection once place in the code, which is in the finally block. Is that right? –  ggkmath Jun 22 '12 at 17:03
    
Yes, as I showed in my template, connections are typically only closed in finally. –  Miserable Variable Jun 22 '12 at 17:29

Use a finally block always to free up resources.

The finally block always executes when the try block exits. This ensures that the finally block is executed even if an unexpected exception occurs.

  try {

      Context context = new InitialContext();
      DataSource ds = (DataSource)context.lookup("jdbc/MyPool");
      conn = ds.getConnection();        

      cs = conn.prepareCall( "{call my_sproc (?)}" );

      cs.registerOutParameter(1, Types.VARCHAR);

      cs.execute();

      String outParam = cs.getString(1); 


  } catch (Exception e) {
      outParam = "an error occurred";
  }
 finally {
       conn.close();
    } 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Kazekage, Will the conn.close() line of code in the finally block give an error if the connection hasn't been open yet or any other reason? If so, shouldn't I use that if (conn!=null) statement above in the finally block? –  ggkmath Jun 22 '12 at 16:50
    
If you suspect that conn.close() will again give an error, surround that with a try catch finally as well. –  Kazekage Gaara Jun 22 '12 at 16:52
1  
@ggkmath yes you need to test for conn != null; it can be null if ds.getConnection() throws exception. And whether you suspect or not, you need to put close() in try/catch/finally; else the method has to incloude it in its throws clause which is not good. –  Miserable Variable Jun 22 '12 at 16:58

java se 7 supports the try-with-resources feature. that generates the finally for you. http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/exceptions/tryResourceClose.html

the finally block will close the resources alocated in the try. like you were using the keyword using in c#

however the user is using java se6 ... See the options of other users :)

IMPORTANT: Statements used should be closed too.

share|improve this answer
    
Great reference for users of java se 7, thanks! –  ggkmath Jun 22 '12 at 17:08
    
I didn't read but the user Miserable Variable talked about try-with-resources too. –  brunoss Jun 22 '12 at 17:12
1  
If you close the connection then statements and resultsets get closed too. –  Miserable Variable Jun 22 '12 at 17:28
2  
I was wrong. The apidocs for Connection do not say that closing a Connection closes its Statements; but note that closing Statement is required to close the ResultSets –  Miserable Variable Jun 22 '12 at 17:48
2  
@MiserableVariable The JDBC spec specifies that Statements are closed when the connection is closed (section 9.4.4.1 of the JDBC 4.1 spec). Also the JavaDoc of Connection.close() states "Releases this Connection object's database and JDBC resources immediately" JDBC Resources are any objects created from a connection (ie Statements) –  Mark Rotteveel Jun 23 '12 at 10:12

I prefer another more elegant way than:

} finally {
  if (conn != null) {
     try {
         conn.close();
     } catch (Exception e) {
         /* handle close exception, quite usually ignore */
     } 
  }
}

You could use DbUtils.closeQuietly: http://commons.apache.org/dbutils/apidocs/org/apache/commons/dbutils/DbUtils.html

share|improve this answer

With Java 7 it's still better. Best practice is to try to get the first error since it's probably the more relevant one. So do everything as if no throw occurs, but design to cleanup properly if a throw did occurs. Following code is a re-write of the question code:

public String MyFunction() throws Exception {

    Connection conn;
    CallableStatement cs;
    // ResultSet rs;
    String outParam = "";
    try {

        conn = ds.getConnection();

        cs = conn.prepareCall("{call my_sproc (?)}");

        cs.registerOutParameter(1, Types.VARCHAR);

        cs.execute();
        // rs = cs.getResultSet();

        outParam = cs.getString(1);

        // assume everything fine but if something
        // gotta throw there you'll got the exception
        rs.close();
        rs = null;
        cs.close();
        cs = null;
        conn.close();
        conn = null;

    } catch (SQLException e) {
        // process exception properly
    } finally {
        // close but catch any error and silent them
        // if there is anything not null there it's because an exception
        // have already been thrown
        // so we don't wan't to mask it, we are in damage control mode here
        // we don't care
        DbUtils.closeQuietly(rs,cs,conn);
    }
    return outparam;
}

/**
 * inspiration from
 * org.apache.commons.dbutils.DbUtils.closeQuietly(Connection conn,
 * Statement stmt, ResultSet rs) local implementation
 * 
 * @param pToClose
 */
public static void closeQuietly(Object... pToClose) {
    for (Object object : pToClose) {
        if (object != null) {
            try {
                if (object instanceof Connection) {
                    ((Connection) object).close();
                }
                if (object instanceof ResultSet) {
                    ((ResultSet) object).close();
                }
                if (object instanceof Statement) {
                    ((Statement) object).close();
                }
            } catch (SQLException e) {
                // silent any error
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
From @Miserable Variable comment I see there is no need to close statement and resultSet if you close connection. When closing the connection take care of them! But still when working with connection pool you have to cleanup and be careful. –  Remi Morin Apr 8 '13 at 16:19

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