Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this module pattern that stores a bunch of vars. I want to create a single function that can return any given var (the real module has real functions- this is just a striped down version).

var myObject = (function() {
  var _savings = '100',
      _year = new Date().getFullYear(),
      _phone = '1-800-555-1234';

return {
  getMe: function(param) {
    return eval(param);
}

an example useage would be myObject.getMe('phone'); would poop out "1-800-555-1234"

I want to avoid the use of eval(), since its so evil.

Thanks!

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In javascript, object.field is equivalent to object["field"].

Now, the problem here is that you've created some private variables that don't belong to an object, so accessing them will be tricky.

An alternative approach would be this:

var myObject = (function() {
  var _privates = {
    savings: '100',
    year: new Date().getFullYear(),
    phone: '1-800-555-1234'
  };

return {
  getMe: function(param) {
    return _privates[param];
  }
}())
share|improve this answer

Try the following:

var myObject = (function() {
    var data = {
        savings: '100',
        year: new Date().getFullYear(),
        phone: '1-800-555-1234'
    };
    return {
        getMe: function(param) {return data[param];}
    };
})();
share|improve this answer
var myObject = {
    phone: '1-800-555-1234',
    year: new Date().getFullYear(),
    savings: 100,
    getMe: function(param) {
        return this[param];
    }
};
alert(myObject.getMe('phone'));
share|improve this answer

Doing this the object-oriented way, you could first create a prototype definition with the members *_savings*, *_year*, *_phone*. Add getMe to the prototype:

var myClass = function() {
    this._savings = '100',
    this._year = new Date().getFullYear(),
    this._phone = '1-800-555-1234';

    myClass.prototype.getMe = function(param) {
       return this[param]; 
    }
}

Then instantiate the object and run the method:

var myObject = new myClass();
console.log(myObject.getMe("_savings"));
  // "100"

Edited original answer (as Dancrumb points out, this does not work; they are private members, so inside the function getMe there is no way to see them).

Use bracket notation:

return this[param];

share|improve this answer
    
Would only work for public fields, not private ones like these –  Dancrumb Jun 22 '12 at 16:47
    
@Dancrumb thanks, you're right of course. I rewrote my answer. –  McGarnagle Jun 22 '12 at 17:07
    
sorry to keep picking, but now you've made these fields public, which means that users can modify them. The OP's technique makes them readonly –  Dancrumb Jun 22 '12 at 21:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.