Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table for which I want to display only the first row by default, but display additional X number of rows if a user clicks a "show more" link (and inversely hide the X rows if the user then clicks "show less").

To exemplify, I want the default view when the page loads to be like so:

 Top Scores
====================================
|   1 | show this row always!      |
====================================
 -show more-

Then, if a user clicks "show more", the table should expand with additional rows and look like this:

 Top Scores
====================================
|   1 | show this row always!      |
|   2 | newly displayed row        |
|   3 | newly displayed row        |
|   4 | newly displayed row        |
|   5 | newly displayed row        |
====================================
 -show less-

Then obviously if a user clicks "show less" the table returns to default (showing only the first row again).

I'm familiar with the .toggle() function in jQuery, but not sure if it can be applied here or if I have to do more manual work.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
add comment

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No additional classes, no headers required - http://jsfiddle.net/wgSZs/

$('table').find('tr:gt(0)').hide();

$("button").on("click", function() {
    $('table').find('tr:gt(0)').toggle();
});

UPDATE

It might be better to hide the additional rows via CSS instead of jQuery to avoid element shifting while the JS is being downloaded and applied. But still no need to add classes - it's a good idea to keep your markup as clean as possible. You can do this:

table tr { display: none }
table tr:first-child { display: block }

Here is the working example - http://jsfiddle.net/wgSZs/1/

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, same answer I settled on! Thanks. Question: wouldn't it be cleaner to add a class to the rows (besides row #0) I want to initially hide, and then set their visibility to none via css? Or is it actually better to use .hide() on the page load as you suggest? –  praguian Jun 22 '12 at 17:00
    
updated ... ... –  Zoltan Toth Jun 22 '12 at 17:05
    
Even better, using the first-child selector instead of having to add classes at the PHP level! Thank you sir. –  praguian Jun 22 '12 at 17:08
    
you are welcome :) –  Zoltan Toth Jun 22 '12 at 17:09
    
Well, first snag: just after adding the CSS, none of my rows are displaying (i.e. first-child selector isn't working, would be my assumption). Any thoughts on what I need to keep in mind? –  praguian Jun 22 '12 at 17:16
show 5 more comments

http://jsfiddle.net/iambriansreed/uwfk8/

var initial_rows_to_show = 2;

(function(_rows){    
    _rows.hide();
    $('a.more').toggle(function(){
        _rows.show(); $(this).text('less');
    },function(){    
        _rows.hide(); $(this).text('more');
    });
})($('tr:gt(' + (initial_rows_to_show - 1) + ')'));
share|improve this answer
add comment

if you mark the added rows with a class like .collapsible, then you can easily toggle their visibility in javascript.

$('.collapsible').show() or $('.collapsible').hide() or $('.collapsible').toggle()

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can do this by hiding of a table & displaying only

$('thead').click(function(){

  $('tbody').show();
})
share|improve this answer
    
I should have specified that the 1st row is part of tbody, not a header row, so your solution would toggle the row I always want to show. My fault for not being specific enough in the question! –  praguian Jun 22 '12 at 16:55
add comment

OK, so after typing the whole question out, StackOverflow decided to show me a relevant related question. :)

It looks like I can use the gt selector via jQuery to toggle only rows greater than a specified row number, which should be perfect for what I want to achieve.

Sorry for the redundant question (assuming this will work for me, have not yet tried it)!

share|improve this answer
add comment

Toggle would work perfectly:

$('#show-link').toggle(function(){

} , function(){

});

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here you go...working example at jsFiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/ndFgF/8/

<table width="500" border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0">
  <tr>
    <th width="25%" id="expand" scope="col">Show More</th>
    <th width="25%" scope="col">&nbsp;</th>
    <th width="25%" scope="col">&nbsp;</th>
    <th width="25%" id="collapse" scope="col">Show Less</th>
  </tr>
  <tr data-rows="togglerow" style="display:none">
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
  </tr>
  <tr data-rows="togglerow" style="display:none">
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
  </tr>
  <tr data-rows="togglerow" style="display:none">
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
  </tr>
  <tr data-rows="togglerow" style="display:none">
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
  </tr>
</table>

Note that the data attribute in the table rows are referenced in the jQuery below:

<script>
$("#collapse").click(function() {
      $("[data-rows='togglerow']").hide(400);
    })
$("#expand").click(function() {
      $("[data-rows='togglerow']").show(400);
    })
</script>

I used the 'data' attribute instead of class name because I like to keep those separate...you can use a class name if you'd like, but don't use ID because it's not a proper way to do it (IDs are supposed to be unique, not repeated).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.