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So I am trying to address this warning: nonstandard conversion between pointer to function and pointer to data I haven't been able to figure out a good way to do this. This is all done in c and not c++.

Currently I have a header file with:

typdef struct myConnection_s
{
    ...
    void*   Callback
} myConnection_t, *Connection


typdef HRESULT (*HttpHook)(Connection, char*);

In other files foo.c I have:

....
Connection myConnection;
...

HttpHook myHook = (HttpHook) myConnection->Callback;
...
return myHook(.....);

Is there a good way to fix this warning without having to change too much? If not what would be the best way to rewrite this?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted
typedef struct myConnection_s
{
    /* ... */
    HttpHook Callback;
} myConnection_t, *Connection;

You can also then drop the explicit cast later on:

HttpHook myHook = myConnection->Callback;

if (myHook)
    myHook(/* ... */);

Edit: Looks like you have an ordering problem... try this:

struct myConnection_s;

typedef HRESULT (*HttpHook)(struct myConnection_s *, char*);

typedef struct myConnection_s
{
    /* ... */
    HttpHook Callback;
} myConnection_t, *Connection;
share|improve this answer
    
This was initial reaction but the problem is the typedef refernces the connection so i get a error since HttpHook is defined after Connection and if i switch them around then i would get an error as well. – Jtello Jun 22 '12 at 17:29
    
@Jtello why can you not define HttpHook before the struct? – Tony The Lion Jun 22 '12 at 17:31
    
@Jtello see my edit – Sean Bright Jun 22 '12 at 17:34

See this answer to a similar question. The C standard does not allow casting a data pointer to a function pointer, and vice versa. You might be able to do it on some platforms, but it isn't portable code.

Sean Bright's answer is the proper way to handle this. You can also use a generic function pointer (void return with no parameters) and cast to/from that type, but that's dangerous in my opinion. If you use a specific function pointer type, the compiler will warn you when you try to use a function with a different signature.

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