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I'm relatively new to coding so please help me out here. The code will only run until the 5th line. This code may be a total babel, but please humor me.

EDIT: There is no exception, nothing happens. After asking me to choose between 1 and 2, the code just stops.

print('This program will tell you the area some shapes')
print('You can choose between...')
print('1. rectangle')
print('or')
print('2. triangle')

def shape():
    shape = int(input('What shape do you choose?'))

    if shape == 1: rectangle
    elif shape == 2: triangle
    else: print('ERROR: select either rectangle or triangle')

def rectangle():
    l = int(input('What is the length?'))
    w = int(input('What is the width?'))
    areaR=l*w
    print('The are is...')
    print(areaR)

def triangle():
    b = int(input('What is the base?'))
    h = int(input('What is the height?'))
    first=b*h
    areaT=.5*first
    print('The area is...')
    print(areaT)
share|improve this question
    
Post the exception or unexpected result you get when you ask questions. "It runs to the 5th line then does nothing and exits", for example. –  Lattyware Jun 22 '12 at 17:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

A better coding style will be putting everything inside functions:

def display():
    print('This program will tell you the area some shapes')
    print('You can choose between...')
    print('1. rectangle')
    print('or')
    print('2. triangle')

def shape():
    shap = int(input('What shape do you choose?'))
    if shap == 1: rectangle()
    elif shap == 2: triangle()
    else:
        print('ERROR: select either rectangle or triangle')
        shape()


def rectangle():
    l = int(input('What is the length?'))
    w = int(input('What is the width?'))
    areaR=l*w
    print('The are is...')
    print(areaR)


def triangle():
    b = int(input('What is the base?'))
    h = int(input('What is the height?'))
    first=b*h
    areaT=.5*first
    print('The area is...')
    print(areaT)

if __name__=="__main__":
    display() #cal display to execute it 
    shape() #cal shape to execute it 
share|improve this answer
3  
I disagree, if you are only calling something once (and can't foresee using it again), then there is no need to put it in a function. –  Lattyware Jun 22 '12 at 17:53
    
Well, you generally only want to put things in the module definition that really are only run once. –  Henry Gomersall Jun 22 '12 at 17:53
    
@Lattyware even if we are calling something once,say display() here, but we're able to control it's execution, we can execute it wherever we want.On the other hand a top-level code is executed from top to bottom and we can't control it. –  undefined is not a function Jun 22 '12 at 17:59
    
@AshwiniChaudhary Yes we can, we simply place the code where we want it to execute. –  Lattyware Jun 22 '12 at 17:59
    
@acattle I did ,scroll down to if __name__=="__main__": –  undefined is not a function Jun 22 '12 at 17:59

Your problem is that you have put your code into functions, but never call them.

When you define a function:

def shape():
    ...

To run that code, you then need to call the function:

shape()

Note that Python runs code in order - so you need to define the function before you call it.

Also note that to call a function you always need the brackets, even if you are not passing any arguments, so:

if shape == 1: rectangle

Will do nothing. You want rectangle().

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry, I'm still confused. How would I call "shape()" and what would I need to change in order to implement "rectangle()"? –  ThroatOfWinter57 Jun 22 '12 at 17:42
    
you also don't need to put int() around input(). input() already returns a number. –  lciamp Jun 22 '12 at 17:45
    
Yes, so how do I make it so that when "1" or "2" are inputted, their respective functions are called? –  ThroatOfWinter57 Jun 22 '12 at 17:47
    
@lciamp That's only true in 2.x, not in 3.x –  Lattyware Jun 22 '12 at 17:51
    
@ThroatOfWinter57 You call a function by following it's name with brackets, potentially containing any arguments. If you don't know how to call a function, I suggest you go and reads a Python tutorial before trying to write more code - it's basic stuff. –  Lattyware Jun 22 '12 at 17:54

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