Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What does sizeof (int) * p semantically mean? Is it:
1. sizeof( (int) *p )
or
2. ( sizeof(int) ) * p
and what rule makes the expression to be evaluated this way?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

sizeof is a unary operator, which has a higher precedence than binary *, so the expression sizeof (int) * p is parsed as (sizeof (int)) * p. Here's the parse tree:

             *
           /   \
       sizeof   p
         |
       (int)

Edit

From onezero's comment:

but can't the expression be evaluated like sizeof( (int) *p ) ,as sizeof operator, type-cast operator and *(dereference) operator have same precedence and associates from right to left?

Here's the relevant syntax (from the ballot draft of the C2011 standard):

(6.5.3) unary-expression:
    postfix-expression
    ++ unary-expression
    -- unary-expression
    unary-operator cast-expression
    sizeof unary-expression
    sizeof ( type-name )
    alignof ( type-name )

As you can see, the (int) is interpreted as part of the sizeof expression, full stop. It is not interpreted as part of a cast-expression. The syntax doesn't allow sizeof to be followed directly by a cast-expression; there must be a unary-operator (one of &, *, +, -, ~, !) between them.

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe you can also link to a Wikipedia article which explains exactly what you just said in one nice table: C/C++ Operator precedence –  Alex Jun 22 '12 at 18:15
    
@JohnBode but can't the expression be evaluated like sizeof( (int) *p ) ,as sizeof operator, type-cast operator and *(dereference) operator have same precedence and associates from right to left? –  onezero Jun 22 '12 at 18:22
    
@Alex: ugh. I wished they'd separated it into two separate tables, one for C and one for C++ (they are two different languages, after all). –  John Bode Jun 22 '12 at 18:23
    
@onezero: No. The language grammar simply won't allow such an interpretation. Once sizeof is recognized, then the next token is assumed to be its operand, whether it's a unary-expression or the sequence ( type-name ). There's no legal derivation for sizeof followed by a cast-expression. –  John Bode Jun 22 '12 at 18:33

Doesn't it depend what p is?

void main()
{
   int p = 3;

   printf("%d", sizeof(int) *p);
}

Will output 12.

void main()
{
   char *p = "a";

   printf("%d", sizeof((int) *p));
}

Will output 4.

share|improve this answer
2  
no it doesn't depends on what p is? In 2nd example you are getting the output as 4 because you have explicitly introduced parenthesis thereby forcing the compiler to evaluate the expression in context relevant(where p is a pointer) way. –  onezero Jun 22 '12 at 17:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.