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I know that the css rules are fairly complex; however, couldn't the following css be fairly simply reduced in a number of ways by the optimizer? And if so, is there an option for it in the rails-sass gem?

span {
    background: red;
    color: green;
}

.test2 {
    background: red;
    color: green;
}

span {
    background: green;
    color: inherit;
}

.test2 {
    background: inherit !important;
    color: inherit;
    color: inherit;
    color: inherit;
}

Additional Context:

To help clarify, I would propose the following as well...

Source:

span {
    background: red;
}
span {
    background: orange;
    color: green;
}
span {
    background: yellow;
}
span {
    background: blue;
    color: green;
}

And, I would want a compiler to generate the following:

span {
    background: blue;
    color: green;
}

I know there are redundant styles, but this happens many times when continually revising stylesheets, and I want to eliminate the dead code.

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You could run the outputted CSS through CSSTidy or the like. –  Whymarrh Sep 24 '12 at 2:15

3 Answers 3

To optimize your code always use '--style compressed' option in your commend line

For example:

sass --watch screen.sass --style compressed

SASS makes your life a lot easier but at the current state it is not possible to have perfect optimizations unless you can write ruby code and will write it your self. There are some workarounds that might look awkward used in your example but the idea behind it to save your time and not have to type it yourself.

for example your could probably optimize your code by using (spaces should also be removed) these approach:

span, .test2 {
    background: red;
    color: green;
}

instead of:

span {
    background: red;
    color: green;
}

.test2 {
    background: red;
    color: green;
}

in pure CSS since it is compatible with the newer SASS syntax in SASS you could do it by:

%theme-red-green { // i couldn't came up with better naming :)
    background: red;
    color: red;
}

span {
    @extend %theme-red-green
}
.test2 {
    @extend %theme-red-green
}

even if we didn't use comma separated style like you would in your plain CSS it would produce optimized code:

span, .test2 {
    background: red;
    color: green;
}

and not repeat same attribute and values:

span {
    background: red;
    color: green;
}

.test2 {
    background: red;
    color: green;
}

have you noticed i used '%theme-' instead of '.theme-' which makes difference in your output. Class selector would be included in your output file

and two unnecessary 'color' properties with 'inherit' values wouldn't be removed even in the compressed mode.

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1  
The point of the question wasn't how to optimize writing the code, but in having a compiler "fix" the redundant lines of css. –  Marshall Anschutz Dec 10 '12 at 23:12
    
@MarshallAnschutz have you ever worked with SASS? what in your opinion is wrong about my answer? my point here is about telling a compiler to fix it, it wasn't able at the time i answered the question to figure it out on it's own. So that way it optimizes your code. Somebody found it useful, so instead of downvoting me, give him a better answer and I will gladly give you an upvote, because what counts at the end is the help people get from you. –  orustammanapov Nov 30 '13 at 17:16
    
if you look at my original question, the source that has 4 spans could have been reduced down to 1 span. Obviously, I could write it that way, but sometimes using a library such as Bootstrap, you override plenty of styles verbatim, causing duplicate styles. My question is asking how to get the compiler to automatically remove the unused css from the document. –  Marshall Anschutz Dec 2 '13 at 15:56
    
I've read your question several times but I still can't find any mention of a bootstrap as such and now please read it yourself and read my answer.You will probably see that from your question it is hard to get how good are you with CSS(since you defining its rules as fairly complex and are giving simple examples).I could just say - NO, at the current state it is not possible(and please look at the date first, you can't come at me with it in two or three years and tell me that I'm wrong).Since didn't know how capable are you I've just tried to give you some tips. Thank you for your reward :) –  orustammanapov Dec 2 '13 at 18:06
    
@orustammanapov I agree with Marshall. While this is a great answer to a different question, I'm hearing him ask how duplicate css is (or is not) removed by SASS automatically. –  ajkochanowicz Sep 22 at 17:21

I think that I may have found a way to at least find the duplicate styles in both css and sass/less templates:

The open source csscss gem http://zmoazeni.github.io/csscss/

It appears to be able to detect duplicates, although I am having to monkey patch around the bootstrap-sass gem's css not being in the same folder as my css assets.

From the documentation, you can run:

$ csscss -v path/to/styles.css

or

$ csscss -v path/to/styles.css.scss
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1  
"although I am having to monkey patch around the bootstrap-sass gem's css not being in the same folder as my css assets." - Please file an issue on github. I'd like to know what you're trying and what is not working. –  Zach Moazeni Apr 16 '13 at 20:17

Not that I know of, SASS will only format your code differently but not optimize it for you http://sass-lang.com/docs/yardoc/file.SASS_REFERENCE.html#output_style

Expanding on Whymarrh's comment, CSSTidy has a command line utility that could be integrated in a build process or similar, http://packages.ubuntu.com/hardy/csstidy

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with csstidy is that it hasn't been maintained in years, so I don't believe that it will support the newer media selectors, and multiple background properties needed for gradients and responsive designs. –  Marshall Anschutz Sep 25 '12 at 23:56
    
That's right but, you can also set a flag to ignore unknown syntaxis, so at least that will be left untouched, I ran some tests yesterday, against a set of 10 exported CSS files and the result was kind of disappointing, in the best case, we had around 1% of gain in compression, keep in mind that our company is very anal when it comes down to performance, so things like #ffffff (instead of #fff) are not acceptable, your mileage may vary, I'd recommend you to take it for a test drive at least :) –  leopic Sep 26 '12 at 0:13
3  
If you have node.js installed there is csso, which looks like it is being actively maintained. The manual explains what optimizations it will do. –  rwb Sep 27 '12 at 5:23

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