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I am using a script like below

SCRIPT

declare -a GET

i=1

awk -F "=" '$1 {d[$1]++;} {for (c in d) {GET[i]=d[c];i=i+1}}' session

echo ${GET[1]} ${GET[2]}

DESCRIPTION

The problem is the GET value printed outside is not the correct value ...

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I'm not sure what you are trying to do. Is this a shell script? if so, you cannot access awk's internal variables from outside of awk. –  ALiX Jun 22 '12 at 18:19
    
You are right I am using a shell script only. But if I need to use the awk variable outside awk statement , what should I do. One of the options that strike in my mind is that can I store that value in one of the shell script variable and if that is the case, how can I access shell script variable inside awk statement . thank you –  User Jun 22 '12 at 18:24
    
I am still not sure what exactly the problem is .. can you please rephrase? What exactly are you expecting to happen, and what is not? –  Levon Jun 22 '12 at 18:26
    
declare -a GET i=1 awk -F '$1 {d[$1]++;} {for (c in d) {GET[i]=d[c];i=i+1}}' session echo ${GET[1]} ${GET[2]} –  User Jun 22 '12 at 18:35
    
Now I want the GET value to be printed correctly after the awk statement –  User Jun 22 '12 at 18:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I understand your question as "how can I use the results of my awk script inside the shell where awk was called". The truth is that it isn't really trivial. You wouldn't expect to be able to use the output from a C program or python script easily inside your shell. Same with awk, which is a scripting language of its own.

There are some workarounds. For a robust solution, write your results from the awk script to a file in a suitably easy format and read them from the shell. As a hack, you could also try to ready the output from awk directly into the shell using $(). Combine that with the set command and you could do:

set -- $(awk <awk script here>)

and then use $1 $2 etc. but you have to be careful with spaces in the output from awk.

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Great answer. I understood your file reading option, but I am not getting the second part(the set command). Could you please give me an instance of set method for my problem . thank you –  User Jun 22 '12 at 18:47
    
I got the output.. I tried using set it worked .. Thanks a lot –  User Jun 22 '12 at 19:13
1  
@User If this answered your question and solved your problem, you should accept this answer by clicking on the checkmark next to the answer - it will reward you and the person who answered with some rep points and mark this problem as solved. –  Levon Jun 22 '12 at 20:50

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