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I created a custom jquery event called 'loading' in my application. I want to append a masking element with a spinner, when this event is triggered. I can figure out that part without problems. However, some elements (images, form inputs, etc..) cannot append child elements. I need to be able to detect if the target of this event can receive child elements. If it cannot, then I will add the spinner & mask to it's parent element.

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have to check the name:

/*global $, jQuery */

function isVoid(el) {
    var tags = ['area', 'base', 'br', 'col', 'command', 'embed', 'hr', 'img', 'input',
                 'keygen', 'link', 'meta', 'param', 'source', 'track', 'wbr'],
        i = 0,
        l,
        name;

    if (el instanceof jQuery) {
        el = el[0];
    }

    name = el.nodeName.toLowerCase();

    for (i = 0, l = tags.length; i < l; i += 1) {
        if (tags[i] === name) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

And use it like this:

var el = document.getElementById('el'),
    elj = $('#el');

if (!isVoid(el)) {
    // append
}
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indexOf isn't cross browser for arrays: developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/… – Joe Jun 22 '12 at 18:39
    
Use _.indexOf if you support IE8 and older – jasssonpet Jun 22 '12 at 18:39
    
Nice. May be worth adding '#text' just in case a text node finds its way in. – squint Jun 22 '12 at 18:41
    
We don't support IE7 or below. Doesn't indexOf work fine in IE8? – demersus Jun 22 '12 at 18:47
    
IE 9+ only, you can use a similar function underscorejs.org/docs/underscore.html#section-47 – jasssonpet Jun 22 '12 at 18:49

You can add child elements, they just won't render. This may sound like a semantic distinction, but it's critical to your problem: the DOM doesn't know whether a particular tag is rendered or not.

Your best bet is just to check manual:

var allowChildren = function(elem) {
   return ! (elem.nodeName in { INPUT : true, IMG : true }) ;
};
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I have never seen that boolean syntax. Is it valid? So I suppose I could look up the spec for void elements, and add it to that hash. – demersus Jun 22 '12 at 18:27
1  
I think creating a table of void elements will be the only real solution. Though I assume you mean return !{ input : true, img : true }[elem.nodeName] – squint Jun 22 '12 at 18:37
    
jsfiddle.net/mblase75/eGyRH/3 -- Chrome lets me add a child element to an <input> tag, even though it's not displayed at all. It's visible in the DOM debugger, just not in the browser window. – Blazemonger Jun 22 '12 at 18:37
    
@NikPetersen -- no, it was a typo. – Malvolio Jun 22 '12 at 18:55
1  
@amnotiam -- sorry, my edits didn't "take" for some reason. I re-applied them. – Malvolio Jun 23 '12 at 17:17

http://jsfiddle.net/mblase75/eGyRH/3/ -- Chrome lets me add a child element to an <input> tag, even though it's not displayed at all. It's visible in the DOM debugger, just not in the browser window.

However, I can test it's .width() and see that's equal to zero or not: http://jsfiddle.net/mblase75/eGyRH/4/

alert($('.element').append('<span>asdf</span>').children().width());​

However, this will also be zero width if, for instance, I'm adding the span to a hidden div: http://jsfiddle.net/mblase75/eGyRH/5/ -- so it's not totally reliable either.

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