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I have two tables that I want to join together.

Table1

Year, ID, Theme,

Table2

First, Last, WeekID, Date, Affiliation

I want to use this command

SELECT * 
FROM Table1 
CROSS JOIN Table2 
WHERE Table1.ID = 5 
    AND WHERE Table2.Date >= 1/1/2011 
    AND Table2.Date <= 12/30/2011 
ORDER BY Asc

What I wanted to happen was all the rows and Columns from Table 1 are selected where the ID column contains an int value of 5. In Table2 all of the columns and rows should be selected that are within the given date range.

I would like to know if the WHERE clause should be coming after the CROSS JOIN clause as I have above. Also Should I remove the second WHERE keyword and instead have the following command.

SELECT * 
FROM Table1 
CROSS JOIN Table2 
WHERE Table1.ID = 5 
    AND Table2.Date >= 1/1/2011 
    AND Table2.Date <= 12/30/2011 
ORDER BY Asc

My third question is the tricky one. Can 2 different WHERE clauses be used in a single command like this but be applied to separate tables? Meaning can I have WHERE Table1 (*Condition*) AND WHERE Table2 (*Condition*) when I am joining the tables?

I think I could easily resolve the entire problem by creating 2 separate SQL commands 1 for each table and just avoid the JOIN and 2 WHERE clauses. Would this be something you would recommend?

The final result would look something like this

Table3

ID, Year, Theme, WeekID, Date, First, Last, Affiliation

Then the cells of would be order in ascending order based on date.

a sample table is below

Table3

ID     Year     Theme     WeekID     Date          First      Last    Affiliation
5      2011     Stuff1    1          01/09/2011    Foo        Bar     Baz Inc
5      2011     Stuff2    2          01/14/2011    Flum       Baz     Bar Inc
5      2011     Stuff3    3          04/15/2011    Bar        Flum    Bub Inc
5      2011     Stuff4    4          05/01/2011    Bar        Foo     FlumBub Inc 
5      2011     Stuff5    5          08/16/2011    Bub        Baz     Foo Inc 
share|improve this question
1  
how are these 2 tables related? there is no join condition... –  Randy Jun 22 '12 at 18:45
2  
@Randy: I guess that's why Derek is using a CROSS JOIN. –  a_horse_with_no_name Jun 22 '12 at 18:46
    
The CROSS JOIN clause should be relating them –  user007 Jun 22 '12 at 18:47
    
cross join will not give your requested output. that would give every row in table2 appended to every row of table1... –  Randy Jun 22 '12 at 18:50
1  
You've stated your intended output. Could you please state what has happened so far in your query? Also, regarding your third question - try it. Try running queries both ways against a sample table with a simple join. You'll get a syntax error for one and not the other. –  Nick Vaccaro Jun 22 '12 at 18:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Q: I would like to know if the WHERE clause should be coming after the CROSS JOIN clause as I have above.

A: Yes, that's the correct placement of the WHERE clause.

Q: Also Should I remove the second WHERE keyword and instead have the following command.

A: Yes, the WHERE clause can appear only once in a simple SELECT statement. Each subquery can have its own WHERE clause, but that's really still one WHERE clause per SELECT.

Q: My third question is the tricky one. Can 2 different WHERE clauses be used in a single command like this but be applied to separate tables? Meaning can I have WHERE Table1 (Condition) AND WHERE Table2 (Condition) when I am joining the tables?

A:The WHERE keyword can appear only once per SELECT. You are free to include predicates on any table.


Also, to answer some additional questions you didn't ask...

You need to provide an expression, or list of expressions, in the ORDER BY clause. The default order is ASC, so this keyword is most frequently omitted.

The predicate on the Date column of Table2 appears to represent date literals. (As they are in your statement, they appear to represent an integer value, derived by a sequence of division operations.

The literals should be explicitly converted to DATETIME (to match the datatype of the Date column). An explicit CONVERT isn't required by SQL Server, but absent the conversion, you really want those to be represented as strings in a canonical (unambiguous) format. (Does '3/5/2012' represent March 5th, or May 3rd?)

SQL Server DATTIME datatype stores both date and time components. Typically, when users ask for an end date, they are meaning any time on that day as well. To take into account that a DATETIME value of '2011-12-30 09:30:00' is NOT <= '2011-12-30', we would normally code a test of LESS THAN midnight of the following day.

It's very good practice to qualify references to columns. This is frequently done with table aliases. Table aliases are not required, but they are a familiar pattern, and can make reading a statement much easier. That's especially true when the table names are fully qualified mydatabase.schema.MyLongAndUnWeILDyTblName, and fully qualified column names used in more complex expressions can make deciphering the expression very tedious. (Not really an issue in your case, but it's a pattern we follow even on simple statements.)

Also, best practice is to avoid using the * in the SELECT list (unless you are selecting from an inline view or CTE within the statement). Instead list the specific expressions you want returned. For testing and development, using * is fine. Aside from those minor issues, your statement looks fine.

(Avoiding the * and qualifying column names avoids PROBLEMS in the future which can occur, for example, when a new column is added to a table, giving rise to an "ambiguous column" exception which wasn't there before. (We like to be able to add columns without running a full regression test of every SQL statement in the application.)

Given all that information you didn't ask for... in our shop, the statement to return your specified resultset would be formatted like this:

SELECT t1.ID
     , t1.Year
     , t1.Theme
     , t2.WeekID
     , t2.Date
     , t2.First
     , t2.Last
     , t2.Affiliation
  FROM dbo.Table1 t1
 CROSS
  JOIN dbo.Table2 t2
 WHERE t1.ID = 5 
   AND t2.Date >= CONVERT(DATETIME,'2011-01-01',20)
   AND t2.Date <  CONVERT(DATETIME,'2011-12-31',20)
 ORDER
    BY t1.ID
     , t1.Year
     , t1.Theme
     , t2.WeekID
     , t2.Date
     , t2.First
     , t2.Last
     , t2.Affiliation

In a later comment, Derek noted that the Date column is VARCHAR. In that unfortunate case, we need to know the format the dates are represented in.

If the string representation are not in a canonical format, the VARCHAR comparison will yield undesirable results.

(Observe that the character string '3/5/2011' is NOT BETWEEN '1/1/2011' AND '12/30/2011'.)

There are significant advantages to using the DATETIME datatype to store date values. If that is not possible (for whatever insidious reason someone comes up with), and the strings are not in a canonical format, then the predicate should really be something more like:

AND CONVERT(DATETIME,t2.Date,101) >= CONVERT(DATETIME,'01/01/2011',101)
AND CONVERT(DATETIME,t2.Date,101) <  CONVERT(DATETIME,'12/31/2011',101)
share|improve this answer
    
I have requested the SQL database to be updated so the Date column is no longer varchar and is instead of type date. This is entirely just testing and experimenting with what could be done with a single SQL command code. We ran into one instance where we encountered an error that said the SQL command was to long. I can;t remember the exact # it gave us but for some reason 128 sticks in my head. –  user007 Jun 22 '12 at 21:24
    
@Derek- the maximum size of SQLText for SQL Server statement is very large. On 64-bit systems, I believe it is on the order of 2GB. You are going to hit other limits WAY BEFORE you hit the SQL Server maximum size of query text. –  spencer7593 Jun 22 '12 at 21:40

I think you'd be best off using a CTE like this:

WITH Table1CTE (COL1, COL2)
AS
(
SELECT COL1, COL2
FROM Table1 
WHERE Table1.ID = 5
),
Table2CTE (COL3, COL4)
AS
(
SELECT COL3, COL4
FROM TABLE2
WHERE Table2.Date >= 1/1/2011 
    AND Table2.Date <= 12/30/2011
)
SELECT *
FROM Table1CTE CROSS JOIN Table2CTE
ORDER BY COL1 ASC
share|improve this answer
    
Could you give me a brief explanation to what exactly this is supposed to do? –  user007 Jun 22 '12 at 19:12
    
Just noticed your comment about the dates - you'll probably need to do a Cast(Table2.Date as DateTime) >= 1/1/2011 for that portion. –  CompuChip Jun 22 '12 at 19:31
    
As far as what the CTEs do, each query within the CTE returns only the records that you want for that table. If you perform a cross join on each CTE, it should give you the records that you want in the cross join. For a great resource on CTEs, check out 4guysfromrolla.com/webtech/071906-1.shtml –  CompuChip Jun 22 '12 at 19:33

The first SELECT command

SELECT *  
FROM Table1  
CROSS JOIN Table2  
WHERE Table1.ID = 5  
    AND WHERE Table2.Date >= 1/1/2011  
    AND Table2.Date <= 12/30/2011  
ORDER BY Asc 

will produce an

incorrect syntax error near keyword WHERE

Only one WHERE statement needs to be used any other conditions can be specified by AND.

Also the dates specified above need to be formatted as such

Table2.Date >= '01/01/2011'  AND Table2.Date <= '12/30/2011'

Otherwise the SQL command will perform integer arithmetic and convert the type to int rather than matching a date string to the dates in the table which are of type varchar.

share|improve this answer
1  
and why are your date columns varchar? –  Stuart Ainsworth Jun 22 '12 at 19:10
    
Because I didn't get to set up the SQL tables I just used them. I have requested it get changed to type date though. Either way date ot varchar requires the date bounds to be enclosed by apostrophes –  user007 Jun 22 '12 at 19:29
    
After the initial WHERE, additional criteria are added by simply an AND - not an AND WHERE ..... You cannot have more than one WHERE in a valid SQL statement –  marc_s Jun 22 '12 at 21:06

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