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Say, we have an N-dimensional grid and some point X in it with coordinates (x1, x2, ..., xN). For simplicity we can assume that the grid is unbounded.

Let there be a radius R and a sphere of this radius with center in X, that is the set of all points in grid such that their manhattan distance from X is equal to R.

I suspect that their will be 2*N*R such points.

My question is: how do I enumerate them in efficient and simple way? By "enumerate" I mean the algorithm, which, given N, X and R will produce the list of points which form this sphere (where point is the list of it's coordinates).

UPDATE: Initially I called the metric I used "Hamming distance" by mistake. My apologies to all who answered the question. Thanks to Steve Jessop for pointing this out.

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The set of values that each co-ordinate can take is {0, 1}, right? –  Steve Jessop Jun 22 '12 at 19:25
    
@SteveJessop: I would say this is unbounded grid with the origin somewhere in it, so every coordinate can take any positive integer value or zero. (xi belongs to {0, 1, 2, ... }) –  izhak Jun 22 '12 at 19:29
2  
in that case the answer is "infinitely many". The set of points at Hamming distance 1 from a given point is every point that differs at exactly 1 co-ordinate, which means it's a complete set of N axes drawn through the point X. The only good news is that it's countably infinite, so you can enumerate them if you have unlimited time ;-) –  Steve Jessop Jun 22 '12 at 19:31
1  
@SteveJessop: I think then I was wrong and what I really meant was Manhattan distance! –  izhak Jun 22 '12 at 19:35
1  
These are the points of fixed L1 norm in an N-dimensional cubic lattice: oeis.org/A035607 - some formulae may give insight on how to enumerate (for radius=3,4, see oeis.org/A035597 oeis.org/A035598) –  ninjagecko Jun 23 '12 at 18:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Consider the minimal axis-aligned hypercube that bounds the hypersphere and write a procedure to enumerate the grid points inside the hypercube.

Then you only need a simple filter function that allows you to discard the points that are on the cube but not in the hypersphere.

This is a simple and efficient solution for small dimensions. For instance, for 2D, 20% of the points enumerated for the bounding square are discarded; for 6D, almost 90% of the hypercube points are discarded.

For higher dimensions, you will have to use a more complex approach: loop over every dimension (you may need to use a recursive function if the number of dimensions is variable). For every loop you will have to adjust the minimal and maximal values depending on the values of the already calculated grid components. Well, try doing it for 2D, enumerating the points of a circle and once you understand it, generalizing the procedure to higher dimensions would be pretty simple.

update: errh, wait a minute, you want to use the Manhattan distance. Calling the cross polytope "sphere" may be correct but I found it quite confusing! In any case you can use the same approach.

If you only want to enumerate the points on the hyper-surface of the cross polytope, well, the solution is also very similar, you have to loop over every dimension with appropriate limits. For instance:

for (i = 0; i <= n; i++)
  for (j = 0; j + i <= n; j++)
    ...
       for (l = 0; l + ...+ j + i <= n; l++) {
         m = n - l - ... - j - i;
         printf(pat, i, j, ..., l, m);
       }

For every point generated that way, then you will have to consider all the variations resulting of negating any of the components to cover all the faces and then displace them with the vector X.

update

Perl implementation for the case where X = 0:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

sub enumerate {
    my ($d, $r) = @_;

    if ($d == 1) {
        return ($r ? ([-$r], [$r]) : [0])
    }
    else {
        my @r;
        for my $i (0..$r) {
            for my $s (enumerate($d - 1, $r - $i)) {
                for my $j ($i ? (-$i, $i) : 0) {
                    push @r, [@$s, $j]
                }
            }
        }
        return @r;
    }
}

@ARGV == 2 or die "Usage:\n  $0 dimension radius\n\n";
my ($d, $r) = @ARGV;
my @r = enumerate($d, $r);
print "[", join(',', @$_), "]\n" for @r;
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1  
This seems to work correctly when tested with oeis.org/A035598 , though non-perl pseudocode would be nice. –  ninjagecko Jun 23 '12 at 18:28
    
I believe the number of steps in this algorithm scales with the hypersurface, as opposed to hypervolume? –  ninjagecko Jun 26 '12 at 0:35

You can work your way recursively from the center, counting zero distance once and working on symmetries. This Python implementation works on the lower-dimension "stem" vector and realizes one 1-dimensional slice at a time. One might also do the reverse, but it would imply iterating on the partial hyperspheres. While mathematically the same, the efficiency of both approaches is heavily language-dependent.

If you know beforehand the cardinality of the target space, I would recommend to write an iterative implementation.

The following enumerates the points on a R=16 hyper-LEGO block in six dimensions in about 200 ms on my laptop. Of course, performance rapidly decreases with more dimensions or larger spheres.

def lapp(lst, el):
    lst2 = list(lst)
    lst2.append(el)
    return lst2

def hypersphere(n, r, stem = [ ]):
    mystem  = lapp(stem, 0)
    if 1 == n:
            ret = [ mystem ]
            for d in range(1, r+1):
                    ret.append(lapp(stem,  d))
                    ret.append(lapp(stem, -d))
    else:
            ret     = hypersphere(n-1, r, mystem)
            for d in range(1, r+1):
                    mystem[-1] = d
                    ret.extend(hypersphere(n-1, r-d, mystem))
                    mystem[-1] = -d
                    ret.extend(hypersphere(n-1, r-d, mystem))
    return ret

(This implementation assumes the hypersphere is centered in the origin. It would be easier to translate all points afterwards than carrying along the coordinates of the center).

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LEGO? Also are you visiting spaces in the interior, or only spaces on the surface? That is, does the algorithm scale with the surface or the volume? –  ninjagecko Jun 23 '12 at 18:35
    
Instead of doing lapp(someList, element), you could just say someList + [element] –  ninjagecko Jun 23 '12 at 18:36
    
Unfortunately, it scales with the (hyper)volume. The lapp() issue and the double recursion into hypersphere(,r-d,) are leftovers of some tests. A further optimization would be for d in range(1, r+1) { mystem[-1] = d; sp = hypersphere(n-1, r-d, mystem); ret.extend(sp); for plane in sp { dipl = list(plane); dipl[0] = -d; ret.append(dipl) } } (sorry for the C-Python hybrid - I am new to this, don't know how to properly indent in comments) –  lserni Jun 23 '12 at 22:12

Input: radius R, dimension D

  • Generate all integer partitions of R with cardinality ≤ D
  • For each partition, permute it without repetition
  • For each permutation, twiddle all the signs

For example, code in python:

from itertools import *

# we have to write this function ourselves because python doesn't have it...
def partitions(n, maxSize):
    if n==0:
        yield []
    else:
        for p in partitions(n-1, maxSize):
            if len(p)<maxSize:
                yield [1] + p
            if p and (len(p)<2 or p[1]>p[0]):
                yield [ p[0]+1 ] + p[1:]

# MAIN CODE    
def points(R, D):
    for part in partitions(R,D):             # e.g. 4->[3,1]
        part = part + [0]*(D-len(part))      # e.g. [3,1]->[3,1,0]    (padding)
        for perm in set(permutations(part)): # e.g. [1,3,0], [1,0,3], ...
            for point in product(*[          # e.g. [1,3,0], [-1,3,0], [1,-3,0], [-...
                  ([-x,x] if x!=0 else [0]) for x in perm
                ]):
                yield point

Demo for radius=4, dimension=3:

>>> result = list( points(4,3) )

>>> result
[(-1, -2, -1), (-1, -2, 1), (-1, 2, -1), (-1, 2, 1), (1, -2, -1), (1, -2, 1), (1, 2, -1), (1, 2, 1), (-2, -1, -1), (-2, -1, 1), (-2, 1, -1), (-2, 1, 1), (2, -1, -1), (2, -1, 1), (2, 1, -1), (2, 1, 1), (-1, -1, -2), (-1, -1, 2), (-1, 1, -2), (-1, 1, 2), (1, -1, -2), (1, -1, 2), (1, 1, -2), (1, 1, 2), (0, -2, -2), (0, -2, 2), (0, 2, -2), (0, 2, 2), (-2, 0, -2), (-2, 0, 2), (2, 0, -2), (2, 0, 2), (-2, -2, 0), (-2, 2, 0), (2, -2, 0), (2, 2, 0), (-1, 0, -3), (-1, 0, 3), (1, 0, -3), (1, 0, 3), (-3, -1, 0), (-3, 1, 0), (3, -1, 0), (3, 1, 0), (0, -1, -3), (0, -1, 3), (0, 1, -3), (0, 1, 3), (-1, -3, 0), (-1, 3, 0), (1, -3, 0), (1, 3, 0), (-3, 0, -1), (-3, 0, 1), (3, 0, -1), (3, 0, 1), (0, -3, -1), (0, -3, 1), (0, 3, -1), (0, 3, 1), (0, -4, 0), (0, 4, 0), (0, 0, -4), (0, 0, 4), (-4, 0, 0), (4, 0, 0)]

>>> len(result)
66

(Above I used set(permutations(...)) to get permutations without repetition, which is not efficient in general, but it might not matter here due to the nature of the points. And if efficiency mattered, you could write your own recursive function in your language of choice.)

This method is efficient because it does not scale with the hypervolume, but just scales with the hypersurface, which is what you're trying to enumerate (might not matter much except for very large radii: e.g. will save you roughly a factor of 100x speed if your radius is 100).

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