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I am beginning to learn Python after being trapped using VB6 forever. To help myself learn some gui with Tkinter, I'm making a simple slot machine. To animate the wheels, I have a ~300x2000 image that has all of the pictures I intend to use displayed as a strip. About 6 pictures right now. I just show part of the image (wheel) at a time to make it spin. Anyway, I'm having trouble with the part of the code where I come to the end of the image and need to transition from the end of the image back to the beginning (wheel spins down, so the start is the bottom and end is the top).

For some reason, I can't get the images to crop and display correctly, even though I think my script makes sense logically. My code is posted below. You can make an image around the resolution of 300x2000 or so to use with this to see the problem I am having. My code starts printing outside of the area that I want it to show (outside the showsize variable) and I can't figure out why.

Any help with this problem would be much appreciated. It seems that the crops don't cut the images short enough, but all the information that I found about it make me think my script should be working just fine. I've tried to annotate my code to explain what's going on.

from Tkinter import *
from PIL import Image, ImageTk

def main():
    root = Tk()
    root.title = ("Slot Machine")
    canvas = Canvas(root, width=1500, height=800)
    canvas.pack()

    im = Image.open("colors.png")
    wheelw = im.size[0] #width of source image
    wheelh = im.size[1] #height of source image
    showsize = 400 #amount of source image to show at a time - part of 'wheel' you can see
    speed = 3 #spin speed of wheel
    bx1 = 250 #Box 1 x - where the box will appear on the canvas
    by = 250 #box 1 y
    numberofspins = 100  #spin a few times through before stopping

    cycle_period = 0  #amount of pause between each frame

    for spintimes in range(1,numberofspins):
        for y in range(wheelh,showsize,-speed):  #spin to end of image, from bottom to top

            cropped = im.crop((0, y-showsize, wheelw, y))  #crop which part of wheel is seen
            tk_im = ImageTk.PhotoImage(cropped)
            canvas.create_image(bx1, by, image=tk_im)  #display image

            canvas.update()                 # This refreshes the drawing on the canvas.
            canvas.after(cycle_period)       # This makes execution pause

        for y in range (speed,showsize,speed):  #add 2nd image to make spin loop
            cropped1 = im.crop((0, 0, wheelw, showsize-y)) #img crop 1
            cropped2 = im.crop((0, wheelh - y, wheelw, wheelh)) #img crop 2
            tk_im1 = tk_im2 = None
            tk_im1 = ImageTk.PhotoImage(cropped1)
            tk_im2 = ImageTk.PhotoImage(cropped2)

            #canvas.delete(ALL)
            canvas.create_image(bx1, by, image=tk_im2)  ###THIS IS WHERE THE PROBLEM IS..
            canvas.create_image(bx1, by + y, image=tk_im1)  ###PROBLEM

            #For some reason these 2 lines are overdrawing where they should be.  as y increases, the cropped img size should decrease, but doesn't

            canvas.update()                 # This refreshes the drawing on the canvas
            canvas.after(cycle_period)       # This makes execution pause

    root.mainloop()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

It's simpler, and much faster and smoother if you don't recreate your images on every cycle. Here's my solution using canvas.move(). Notice that I moved the canvas.create_image calls outside of the for loop. I also put the code in a class and added a 'spin' button, and added something to make it exit without errors.

from Tkinter import *
from PIL import Image, ImageTk
import sys

class SlotMachine():
    def __init__(self):
        root = Tk()
        root.title = ("Slot Machine")
        self.canvas = Canvas(root, width=1200, height=800)
        self.canvas.grid(column=0,row=0)
        button = Button(root, text="Spin!", width=20, command = self.spin)
        button.grid(column=0,row=1)

        self.alive = True
        root.protocol("WM_DELETE_WINDOW", self.die)
        root.mainloop()

    def spin(self):

        im = Image.open("colors.png")
        wheelw = im.size[0] #width of source image
        wheelh = im.size[1] #height of source image
        showsize = 400 # amount of source image to show at a time -
                       # part of 'wheel' you can see
        speed = 3 #spin speed of wheel
        bx1 = 250 #Box 1 x - where the box will appear on the canvas
        by = 250 #box 1 y
        numberofspins = 100  #spin a few times through before stopping
        cycle_period = 3  #amount of pause between each frame

        tk_im1 = ImageTk.PhotoImage(im)
        tk_im2 = ImageTk.PhotoImage(im)
        im1id = self.canvas.create_image(bx1, by + showsize, image=tk_im1)
        im2id = self.canvas.create_image(bx1, by + showsize + wheelh, 
                                         image=tk_im2)

        for spintimes in range(1,numberofspins):
            for y in range(wheelh,0,-speed): 
                if self.alive:

                    self.canvas.move(im1id, 0, -speed)
                    self.canvas.move(im2id, 0, -speed)

                    self.canvas.update() 
                    self.canvas.after(cycle_period)
                else:
                    sys.exit()

            self.canvas.move(im1id, 0, wheelh)
            self.canvas.move(im2id, 0, wheelh)

    def die(self):
        self.alive = False

if __name__ == '__main__':
    mySlotMachine = SlotMachine()

This will place parts of the wheel outside of its box, but you can just put your slot machine texture on top of that.

share|improve this answer
    
I like how you are using move, but this isn't a very good solution. A good rule of thumb is to never put a sleep statement in a GUI, and you're doing this with the call to after. This will cause the GUI to completely freeze, which is not a good user experience. A better solution is to start the event loop before doing the animation, then use after to call a function periodically to update the display. –  Bryan Oakley Feb 28 '13 at 13:58
    
@BryanOakley: I see your point, that is not ideal and I'll change it. Still, that part is not really what the question is about. This does fix the main problem that had the image drawn incorrectly. –  Junuxx Feb 28 '13 at 14:00
    
@BryanOakley: Better? –  Junuxx Mar 3 '13 at 20:06
    
@Junxx: unless you're seeing something I'm not, no, it's not better. You still call after with a single argument, which means the GUI will sleep periodically. You're also calling update which has potentially bad side effects. Unless you teach a beginner the downsides of calling update, it's not a good idea to teach them to use it in the first place. –  Bryan Oakley Mar 3 '13 at 22:37

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