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see fiddle

html

<div class="e" style="left:5px;top:5px;">aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb</div>

<div class="e" style="left:5px;top:100px;">aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa</div>​

css

.e {
    font-size: 10px;
    font-family: arial;
    background-color: yellow;
    position: absolute;
    max-width: 300px;
}

you will notice the 2nd div fits the size of the content exactly, but on the first div there's a bunch of empty space to the right of the a's and b's. This is because the div hit its max width of 300px and then wrapped the b's to a 2nd line. The wrapping is good, but then I would expect the div to then shrink back down to the width of the a's so that there's no empty space to the right.

Is it possible to get it to do this?

Tested in Chrome and FF. ​

share|improve this question
    
Do you want a JavaScript hack? Or are you looking for pure CSS? –  gilly3 Jun 28 '12 at 20:55
    
@gilly3: JavaScript is OK. The div is being built with JS anyway. –  Mark Jun 28 '12 at 23:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To shrink a div (or any element) to the size of its text content, you can use JavaScript to get a range that contains its contents and get the size of the range using range.getBoundingClientRect():

function sizeElementToContents(el) {
    var range = document.createRange();
    range.selectNodeContents(el);
    var textRect = range.getBoundingClientRect();
    el.style.width = textRect.width + "px";
}

But, of course, that only works with Modern browsers. IE8 and IE7 have different methods for working with ranges. Actually, IE7 automatically handles max-width the way you want it to, but when our IE8 code is run to re-size the divs on IE7, it shrinks the divs to 0. To avoid writing code for specific browser versions, this code runs on IE7 and IE8, but includes a little extra logic so that it works on both browser versions:

function sizeElementToContents(el) {
    var range, width;
    if (document.createRange) {
        range = document.createRange();
        range.selectNodeContents(el);
        width = range.getBoundingClientRect().width;
    }
    else {
        range = document.body.createTextRange();
        range.moveToElementText(el);
        range.moveStart("character", 1);
        width = range.boundingWidth;
        var height = range.boundingHeight;
        range.collapse();
        range.moveEnd("character", 1);
        if (range.boundingHeight == height) {
            return; // text doesn't wrap, so don't resize
        }
    }
    el.style.width = width + "px";
}

Working demo: http://jsfiddle.net/gilly3/HZRFb/

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that looks exactly like what I wanted. Thank you for your help! –  Mark Jul 7 '12 at 1:29
    
Floating also "shrinks to fit". –  GlennG Nov 13 '12 at 15:37

you may avoid handling the width, as my understanding is that you're looking for a way to break the text in a satisfying manner.

use word-break: break-all, to wrap the text whenever it hits the container's edge.

Example:

Reference:

share|improve this answer
    
Nope... I don't want to split the word. As I said, "the wrapping is good". –  Mark Jun 22 '12 at 21:19
    
i'll try and tackle this another way, but as for now i don't see how that can be done.. –  Eliran Malka Jun 22 '12 at 21:20
    
don't you mean word-wrap:break-word; ? –  GlennG Nov 13 '12 at 15:36
    
no, i meant what i wrote. follow the link to the MDN page on this for further information. –  Eliran Malka Nov 13 '12 at 17:12

Forking from Biziclop's solution:

.e {
    font-size: 10px;
    font-family: arial;
    background-color: yellow;
    position: absolute;
    max-width: 300px;
    margin-right:100%;
}

Link to the Fiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, using 100% is probably better than some arbitrary pixel value. –  biziclop Jun 22 '12 at 21:57
2  
After further investigation, this doesn't quite give the effect I was after: jsfiddle.net/mnbayazit/2cTga/18 It squashes the div down to the size of the largest word, whereas I didn't want any squashing effect...I just wanted the div to the be width of the longest line that can naturally fit within the max-width. –  Mark Jun 22 '12 at 22:19

Don't ask me why it works, it might break tomorrow, but adding some extreme margin-right seems to solve the problem:

.e {
    margin-right: 9999px;
}

See http://jsfiddle.net/2cTga/1/

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure why people are downvoting you. It does work in my version of Chrome. Sounds a bit unreliable, but it's the best/only solution so far. –  Mark Jun 22 '12 at 21:20
    
It works but it might result in unexpected behavior on some browsers. Some say if it's stupid and it works then it's not stupid, but you can't be sure that this solution constantly works. –  Nit Jun 22 '12 at 21:23
    
The worst things that can happen: 1. it simply doesn't work 2. it might force horizontal scrollbars. It is important that the divs are positioned absolute, so it can't harm other elements. At the same time somebody could explain why it works anyway. –  biziclop Jun 22 '12 at 21:52
2  
The reason it works is because you have given it another defining factor to its width. The absolute element is not explicitly defined for it's left/right position, so adding the margin is telling it to define the right side by its relation to the right side of the window (but it does not allow it to go lower than content width). Note the effect with a smaller number that works if the screen is small, but stretch this fiddle wide, and it doesn't. I think it is probably a generally safe move (though I would thoroughly test), but the idea is creative. +1! –  ScottS Jun 22 '12 at 22:00
    
I found an interesting variation of your fiddle: jsfiddle.net/2cTga/17 –  biziclop Jun 22 '12 at 22:10

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