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This is some code that is behaving peculiarly. This is a simplified version of the behavior that I've written. This will still demonstrate the weird behavior and I had some specific questions on why this is occurring.

I'm using Python 2.6.6 on Windows 7.

def demo1():
    try:
        raise RuntimeError,"To Force Issue"
    except:
        return 1
    else:
        return 2
    finally:
        return 3

def demo2():
    try:
        try:
            raise RuntimeError,"To Force Issue"
        except:
            return 1
        else:
            return 2
        finally:
            return 3
    except:
        print 4
    else:
        print 5
    finally:
        print 6

if __name__ == "__main__":
    print "*** DEMO ONE ***"
    print demo1()
    print "****************"
    print 
    print "*** DEMO TWO ***"
    print demo2()
    print "****************"

When you run this script, it will print:

*** DEMO ONE ***
3
****************

*** DEMO TWO ***
6
3
****************

Why is demo one returning 3 instead of 1? Why is demo two printing 6 instead of printing 6 w/ 4 or 5?

Thanks for your help.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Because finally statements are guaranteed to be executed (well, presuming no power outage or anything outside of Python's control). This means that before the function can return, it must run the finally block, which returns a different value.

The Python docs state:

When a return, break or continue statement is executed in the try suite of a try...finally statement, the finally clause is also executed ‘on the way out.’ A continue statement is illegal in the finally clause. (The reason is a problem with the current implementation — this restriction may be lifted in the future).

This means that when you try to return, the finally block is called, returning it's value, rather than the one that you would have had.

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1  
why doesnt the 5 print in the second example? this is still not well explained I think. the return one is well answered but why doesnt the 5 in the second example print –  Joran Beasley Jun 22 '12 at 21:14
3  
oh i think i figured it out the return in the initial try causes it to jump immediately to the outer finally –  Joran Beasley Jun 22 '12 at 21:19
1  
Exactly, because finally blocks always run. –  Lattyware Jun 22 '12 at 21:20
1  
In demo two, why does it execute the nested finally, kick out to the outside finally then go back into the nested finally to finish the return instead of simply returning None from the outside finally? –  Kyle Owens Jun 22 '12 at 21:23
1  
Because when the return statement is called, Python checks for any open finally clauses that need to be executed (see the quote above). –  Lattyware Jun 22 '12 at 21:28

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