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I expected this little snippet to print "Why doesn't this work?" Can someone help me understand why this doesn't work as I expect? I'm using Python 2.6, if this matters.

class WhyDoesntThisWork(object):
  def outer(self):
    acc = ''
    def inner(msg):
      global acc
      acc = acc + msg
    inner("Why doesn't")
    inner(" this work?")
    print acc
WhyDoesntThisWork().outer()
  • If I include the global statement I get a NameError: global name 'acc' is not defined .
  • If I don't include the global statement I get a UnboundLocalError: local variable 'acc' referenced before assignment.
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4  
global does not work with closures. You'd need nonlocal from python 3 instead. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 22 '12 at 21:08
1  
Use a mutable instead (no global keyword); acc = [], acc.append, etc. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 22 '12 at 21:10
2  
Why it matters: because acc.append(msg) does not need to point acc to a different object as acc = acc + msg does. –  kindall Jun 22 '12 at 21:14
2  
Mutable/Immutable matters because closures in Python are read-only. Once acc has been closed upon, its value cannot be changed. However, if you use a mutable object (such as a list or dict, where the value in this case should be considered as the object reference) you are free to change the contents. –  shu zOMG chen Jun 22 '12 at 21:20
1  
Closures are not read-only in Python 3, where nonlocal can be used. –  kindall Jun 22 '12 at 21:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I don't know why so many comments above contain the correct answer and no one dared to write an actual answer, so I'll do it hereby.

class ThisWorksNow(object):
  def outer(self):
    acc = []
    def inner(msg):
      acc.append(msg)
    inner("Why doesn't")
    inner(" this work?")
    print "".join(acc)
ThisWorksNow().outer()

What is the difference?

Assigning a name to an object which is in the closure doesn't work in Python 2.x, because the Py3 keyword nonlocal is missing, so we have to find a workaround.

If we have to keep the name-to-object-binding constant, we have to change something else. In this case, it is the object, to which we add the content to be added.

The print line is not very elegant; maybe an object which prints its contents concatenated might be more suitable.

class StringBuilder(list): # class name stolen from Java
    def __str__(self):
        """this makes the object printable in a way which represents the concatenated string"""
        return "".join(self)
    @property
    def string(self):
        """this gives us a property which represents the concatenated string"""
        return "".join(self)
 # use whatever suits you better, one or both

With this, we can do that:

class ThisWorksNow(object):
  def outer(self):
    acc = StringBuilder()
    def inner(msg):
      acc.append(msg)
    inner("Why doesn't")
    inner(" this work?")
    print acc
    print acc.string # depending on what you take above
ThisWorksNow().outer()

Edit (append): Why does global not work?

We could achieve this with global as well, with 2 downsides.

  1. acc would have to be made global on both places we use it

    class WhyDoesntThisWork(object):
      def outer(self):
        global acc
        acc = ''
        def inner(msg):
          global acc
          acc = acc + msg
    

    Hereby we "lift" both acc occurrences to "global" level.

  2. acc could be modified from outside.

    If we do global acc somewhere else, or we use acc on module level, our process can be tampered with. This should be avoided.

share|improve this answer
    
Please clarify. Rather than just perceiving that the nonlocal keyword would allow this to work, please explain the mechanics of what happens when using the global keyword in that place. Is the global keyword ignored by the interpreter, etc. –  wberry Jun 22 '12 at 22:34
    
I think I see. This implies that the global keyword really only applies to variables defined at the module level; and that using global within a closure isn't a problem in itself, as some commenters have claimed. –  wberry Jun 22 '12 at 22:47
    
It is not a big problem, but it is unclean, as it pollutes the module level name space and might lead to collisions. –  glglgl Jun 22 '12 at 22:51

You can create a helper closure class like below to explicitly mark the variable as closure. Not sure if such a utility already exist.

class closure:
    def __init__(self, val = None):
        self.val = val
    def __call__(self, val = None):
      if val:
        self.val = val
      return self.val
class WhyDoesntThisWork(object):
  def outer(self):
    acc = closure('')
    def inner(msg):
      acc(acc() + msg)
    inner("Why doesn't")
    inner(" this work?")
    print acc
WhyDoesntThisWork().outer()
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