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A colleague of mine has the following (apparently invalid) JPQL query:

SELECT NEW com.foobar.jpa.DonationAllocationDTOEntity(a.id, a.campaign, a.campAppeal, a.campDivision, a.divisionFund)
FROM DonationAllocation a JOIN a.donation d JOIN a.allocationType t
JOIN FETCH a.campaign
WHERE d.id = :donationId
AND (t.code = 'Pledge' OR t.code = 'MatchingPledge')

It is worth noting (for later in this message) that DonationAllocation's relationship with a Campaign entity is many-to-one, and is marked as FetchType.LAZY. My colleague's intent with this query is to (among other things) ensure that a.campaign is "inflated" (eagerly fetched).

Hibernate (obviously just one JPA implementation of several), when faced with this query, says:

query specified join fetching, but the owner of the fetched association was not present in the select list

This makes sense, as the select list contains only NEW DonationAllocationDTOEntity(), and section 4.4.5.3 of the JPA 2.0 specification says:

The association referenced by the right side of the FETCH JOIN clause must be an association or element collection that is referenced from an entity or embeddable that is returned as a result of the query.

So since there is no "entity or embeddable that is returned as a result of the query" (it's a DTO constructed using the NEW operator), it follows that there is no possible association for a FETCH JOIN to reference, and hence this query is invalid.

How, given this limitation, should one construct a JPQL query in this case such that a.campaign--passed into the constructor expression--is fetched eagerly?

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1 Answer 1

I would simply select the entity and its association, and llopover the results to invoke the DTO constructor explicitely. You would have the additional advantage of compile-time checks and refactorable code:

select a from DonationAllocation a 
JOIN a.donation d 
JOIN a.allocationType t
JOIN FETCH a.campaign
WHERE d.id = :donationId
AND (t.code = 'Pledge' OR t.code = 'MatchingPledge')

...

for (DonationAllocation a : list) {
    result.add(new DonationAllocationDTOEntity(a.id, 
                                               a.campaign,
                                               a.campAppeal, 
                                               a.campDivision, 
                                               a.divisionFund));
}

EDIT:

This query should also select what's needed, and avoid selecting the whole DonationAllocation entity:

select a.id, a.campaign, a.campAppeal, a.campDivision, a.divisionFund
from DonationAllocation a 
JOIN a.donation d 
JOIN a.allocationType t
WHERE d.id = :donationId
AND (t.code = 'Pledge' OR t.code = 'MatchingPledge')

and you might just add the DTO constructor in the query if you want:

select new com.foobar.jpa.DonationAllocationDTOEntity(a.id, a.campaign, a.campAppeal, a.campDivision, a.divisionFund)
from DonationAllocation a 
JOIN a.donation d 
JOIN a.allocationType t
WHERE d.id = :donationId
AND (t.code = 'Pledge' OR t.code = 'MatchingPledge')

The fact the a.campaign is in the select clause should be sufficient to tell Hibernate to load the entity. At least that's how it behaves in my tests.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. DonationAllocation is currently a huge object, with way too many EAGER relationships. I believe my colleague is attempting to pull back only certain parts of it. It just so happens that one of those relationships he does in fact want eagerly loaded in this query. With this new knowledge, would that change your answer? –  Laird Nelson Jun 23 '12 at 0:33
    
Yes, see my answer. But if loading the entity is such a problem, it just means that its eager associations should be made lazy. I prefer making everything lazy. –  JB Nizet Jun 23 '12 at 6:00

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