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Could you please clarify this part of Apple's documentation: Transitioning to ARC Release Notes - Frequently Asked Questions

How do blocks work in ARC?

Blocks "just work" when you pass blocks up the stack in ARC mode, such as in a return. You don’t have to call Block Copy any more. You still need to use [^{} copy] when passing "down" the stack into arrayWithObjects: and other methods that do a retain.

What is passing blocks up and down the stack? Does it mean I would have to copy blocks I return from a function or method in MRC but in ARC I don't have to?

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What is passing blocks up and down the stack?

They mean passing a block as a parameter to another method (or function) and returning a block as the result of a method (or function).

Does it mean I would have to copy blocks I return from a function or method in MRC but in ARC I don't have to?

I believe that's right.

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Strange but, when I try to imagine the call stack, the functions/methods I invoke are "layered" on top of what was called previously, so a function/method that returns a block would pass it down the stack, not up the stack as the quote suggests. Should I turn it upside down about the way I see it? –  Miles Hughes Jun 22 '12 at 22:05
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I think that down would mean deeper. –  Johnnywho Jun 22 '12 at 23:52
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On most systems, iOS included, the stack grows downward in memory. That is, when you push two values onto the stack, the address of the first one pushed will be higher than that of the second. When a value is pushed, the stack pointer is decremented, and when a value is popped off the stack, the stack pointer is incremented. So, you call "down" and return "up." –  William Shakespeare Jun 23 '12 at 0:03

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