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My instructions are to call a function when passing variables into an insert statement to prevent code injection. What does the following code do and what actually gets inserted into the database? Why doesn't this have a value statement and it appears to have a select inside the insert?

<CFQUERY NAME="Survey1" DATASOURCE="#APPLICATION.mainDSN#">
    INSERT INTO TWHSurvey_QA
    (Comment, QuestionID, SurveyID, Rank)
    <cfloop from="1" to="#SESSION.lastPage#" index="curPage">
        <cfloop from="1" to="#ArrayLen(SESSION.HQQuestionStruct.pagesQuestions[curPage])#" index="curQuestion">
            SELECT  
                <cfif SESSION.HQQuestionStruct.pagesQuestions[curPage][curQuestion].Type eq 1>
                    <cfif SESSION.HQQuestionStruct.pagesQuestions[curPage][curQuestion].Cur_Ans neq "">
                        '#SESSION.HQQuestionStruct.pagesQuestions[curPage][curQuestion].Cur_Ans#',
                    <cfelse>
                        NULL,
                    </cfif>
                <cfelse>
                    <cfif SESSION.HQQuestionStruct.pagesQuestions[curPage][curQuestion].Comment_Val neq "">
                        '#SESSION.HQQuestionStruct.pagesQuestions[curPage][curQuestion].Comment_Val#',
                    <cfelse>
                        NULL,
                    </cfif>
                </cfif>

                #SESSION.HQQuestionStruct.pagesQuestions[curPage][curQuestion].QuestionID#,
                #getLatestSurveyID.SurveyID#,

                <cfif SESSION.HQQuestionStruct.pagesQuestions[curPage][curQuestion].Type eq 2>
                    <cfif SESSION.HQQuestionStruct.pagesQuestions[curPage][curQuestion].Cur_Ans neq "" AND SESSION.HQQuestionStruct.pagesQuestions[curPage][curQuestion].Cur_Ans neq 0>
                        #SESSION.HQQuestionStruct.pagesQuestions[curPage][curQuestion].Cur_Ans#
                    <cfelse>
                        NULL
                    </cfif>
                <cfelseif SESSION.HQQuestionStruct.pagesQuestions[curPage][curQuestion].Type eq 3>
                    <cfif SESSION.HQQuestionStruct.pagesQuestions[curPage][curQuestion].Cur_Ans eq "Yes">
                        1
                    <cfelseif SESSION.HQQuestionStruct.pagesQuestions[curPage][curQuestion].Cur_Ans eq "No">
                        0
                    <cfelse>
                        NULL
                    </cfif>
                <cfelse>
                    NULL
                </cfif>
            <CFIF curPage eq SESSION.lastPage AND curQuestion eq ArrayLen(SESSION.HQQuestionStruct.pagesQuestions[curPage])>
            <CFELSE> 
                UNION ALL
            </CFIF>
        </cfloop>
    </cfloop>
</CFQUERY>
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When using an INSERT there are two ways:

INSERT INTO yourTable (col1, col2)
VALUES (val1, val2)

OR

INSERT INTO yourTable (col1, col2)
SELECT col1, col2
FROM table1

Your query is Inserting into your table TWHSurvey_QA, but it is Selecting variables, but you have If statements around some of the values you will be inserting.

Basically it is selecting the variables:

INSERT INTO TWHSurvey_QA (Comment, QuestionID, SurveyID, Rank)
SELECT 
    If statement to decide the comment value
    , QuestionId
    , SurveyID
    , If statement to decide the Rank value
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2  
Just to note, the if statements here occur as part of the SQL construction - i.e. before it is sent to the database, so from an SQL perspective it's just a simple list of values. –  Peter Boughton Jun 22 '12 at 23:18
    
@PeterBoughton agreed it is a list of values. –  bluefeet Jun 23 '12 at 16:40

The answer above explains well how the SQL and CFML works together here. Peter's comment is important too.

However it misses out part of your question.

You ask about protecting from code injection, and you're not achieving that here. I'm assuming these session variables originally came from a form - based on their name - which means the comment variable could have anything in it, exposing yourself to code injection just by slapping it straight in the DB like that.

The quickest win here is to never hard-code your dynamic values into the SQL string, instead passing them as parameters via <cfqueryparam>. This has the added bonus of passing more uniform SQL to the DB, so the DB has a chance to maintain fewer compiled SQL statements, which'll give you a slight (but usually tangible) performance boost too.

Also in your case using <cfqueryparam> tags could simplify/clarify the logic around whether to pass a null or not: set a summary variable based on your conditions, and then use that variable as the value for the null attribute of the <cfqueryparam>.

This is not the only thing you need to do, though: it only protects you from SQL injection. You might be leaving yourself open to JS injection too, in that comment field. You need to look at dealing with that too.

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1  
Right that's what my job is to go through all these old files and prevent injection (believe me not fun). I was told to use <cfqueryparam> on all variable in SQL statments, and additionally for insert statments call a function someone made that sanitizes the variable. Isn't that over kill to call a sanitizing function and cfqueryparam? That's actually were my original question stems from is I wasn't sure if I should be calling the sanitizing function in the example above since I haven't seen insert statment likes this. –  Celeritas Jun 23 '12 at 9:54
1  
Well there's two sides of it: 1) to sanitise the content going in. This is not the job of <cfqueryparam>, really, although it does help to prevent SQL injection attempts from having a chance to work. Using <cfqueryparam> stops that dead. However it doesn't protect against the content of the data being malicious in other ways. For example XSS attacks; 2) (and the real reason why one parameterises ones dynamic values: it allows the DB server to compile and cache the SQL statement for later use, irrespective of the dynamic parameters. [cont'ed below] –  Adam Cameron Jun 23 '12 at 10:50
1  
[cont'ed from above] For example if you include your dynamic values inline like you have, for every single combination of DATA that you pass to the DB, the DB has to do a separate compilation (which is slow), and caching (which takes up resources). If you pass the data as parameters, the SQL statement will be the same every time, so there's just one compile, and one statement being cached. So in short you should use both a sanitisation process and a parameterising process. –  Adam Cameron Jun 23 '12 at 10:55
    
I never "sanitise" data before putting it in the database, because sanitising means you're destroying information which might be needed later. Data should be encoded/escaped at OUTPUT - i.e. in the context where it ends up being used - and that way you always know you're using the correct methods. –  Peter Boughton Jun 23 '12 at 14:24
    
I know what you mean Peter, and for valid data, I do the same thing. However if someone hands me a bowl of poo, I don't put it in the fridge in case I want to eat it later... I already know it's not valid food, so I chuck it out. I never put it in the fridge. Equally, I don't pick through it to see if there's any good bits: I chuck the whole lot out. If user input has potential XSS code in it, it should simply be rejected. So on reflection I should have been more explicit that I didn't mean "sanitise", I mean "reject". The point being simply using <cfqueryparam> is inadequate. –  Adam Cameron Jun 24 '12 at 8:06

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