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I've been asked to do the following: If it is possible to buy x, x+1,…, x+5 sets of McNuggets, for some x, then it is possible to buy any number of McNuggets >= x, given that McNuggets come in 6, 9 and 20 packs. Write an iterative program that finds the largest number of McNuggets that cannot be bought in exact quantity.

Here's the code i came up with, but it get's stuck in an infinite loop:

count = 0
n = 1
while count < 6:
    six_consequtive = True
    for a in range(n):
        for b in range(n):
            for c in range(n):
                if 6*a + 9*b + 20*c == n:
                    six_consequtive = False
    if six_consequtive:
        count += 1
    else:
        count = 0

    n += 1

print("Largest number of McNuggets that cannot be bought in exact quantity: %d." % (n - 5))

Thank you very much!

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Could you explain the purpose of the "six consecutive" test? Did your homework assignment say that once you find six values with some property in a row, that you could assume you have the answer? If so, could you describe that property? –  steveha Jun 22 '12 at 22:53
    
Yes, as i stated in the question abouve, if it is possible to buy x, x+1,…, x+5 sets of McNuggets, for some x, then it is possible to buy any number of McNuggets >= x, given that McNuggets come in 6, 9 and 20 packs. It's because if you find 6 consequtive sets, you can always add 6 to each set of them infinitely. Therefore, the set that was before set x is the biggest set that can't be bought. I hope i understood you question correctly. Thank you. –  geekkid Jun 25 '12 at 10:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It seems pretty clear what the problem is: you only increment count when it is possible to get the exact quantity. Any time you don't increment count you reset it to 0, and the loop only stops when this exceeds 6. That might take a while.

You wrote a triply-nested for loop, so the larger n gets, the slower these loops get. It's possible that if you let it run long enough it might succeed and finish someday; but your basic algorithm is just too slow.

You can find out more by instrumenting your loops with print statements. When I tried it, I wasn't getting output; I figured that was probably due to buffering issues, so I wrote a simple output function that outputs a string and then flushes to make sure I can see the output right away.

Here's your program so edited:

import sys

def out(s):
    sys.stdout.write(s + "\n")
    sys.stdout.flush()

count = 0
n = 1
while count < 6:

    six_consecutive = True
    for a in range(n):
        for b in range(n):
            for c in range(n):
                #out("a: %d b: %d c: %d  n: %d" % (a, b, c, n))
                if 6*a + 9*b + 20*c == n:
                    six_consecutive = False

    out("n == %d  count == %d  six_consecutive == %s" %
            (n, count, str(six_consecutive)))

    if six_consecutive:
        count += 1
    else:
        count = 0

    n += 1

print("Largest number of McNuggets that cannot be bought in exact quantity: %d." % (n - 5))

I also fixed the spelling on "six_consecutive".

So, how should you fix this? I think you should throw this away and rewrite with a better algorithm. You might want to check and see how other people have solved this problem, or a similar problem. This strikes me as being very similar to the classic problem of how to make change, when given a set of coins of different denominations.

NOTE: The classic problem of making change usually assumes a sensible set of coins, including a coin with the value 1. A simple "greedy" algorithm, starting with the largest coin and working down, will always succeed. This is a bit more interesting because the "coins" set is weird and there are values that cannot be found, so maybe the classic coin problem isn't as relevant as I thought.

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Thank you very much for your help. But i finally got my algorithm working, and i don't thing i just had to change the boolean values in the six_consequtive and -5 to -7 in the print statement. –  geekkid Jun 22 '12 at 23:00
    
Do you mean that the McNuggets come in quantities of 5, 7, and 20? –  steveha Jun 22 '12 at 23:08

I'm sorry , i just realized i had the boolean values reversed. The first six_consequtive at the beginning of the loop should be assigned False and the second True. Again, I'm very sorry for the dumb question.

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When you make this change and run the program, it gets the answer 45. If you buy 5 boxes of the 9-count McNuggets, 5 * 9 == 45, so this is not a correct answer. –  steveha Jun 22 '12 at 22:36
    
If you feel the question is not useful you can delete it. –  wberry Jun 22 '12 at 22:43
    
You are right, i also had to change the -5 to -7. I think the -5 was a typo :D . –  geekkid Jun 22 '12 at 22:56

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