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checking if pointer points within an array

If I have an array and a size, and I want to check if a given pointer points to an element inside an array, is there any way to do so in standard C or C++ without invoking UB?

Does this work?

bool is_inside(someType * array, int size, someType * other_pointer){
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
        if (array + i == other_pointer)
            return true;
    return false;
}

edit: It is my understanding that you cannot use comparisons other than == and != for pointers not pointing to the same array without UB (although in practice it works as expected). Was I wrong in this?

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marked as duplicate by Charles Bailey, GManNickG, Jonathan Wakely, Bo Persson, Siddharth Rout Jun 23 '12 at 6:27

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So have you tested it? Does it work? –  ArtemStorozhuk Jun 22 '12 at 22:18
2  
@Astor testing is not a good way to make sure it works "without invoking UB". –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 22 '12 at 22:19
1  
@R.MartinhoFernandes--that might not actually point to an element in the array though. –  SirPentor Jun 22 '12 at 22:19
1  
@R.MartinhoFernandes when you put it that way I suppose you're right. –  SirPentor Jun 22 '12 at 22:23
    
@R. Martinho Fernandes what about: type T a[5]; type T b; is_inside(a, 5, &b); –  zounds Jun 22 '12 at 22:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It depends on what you mean by UB.

Specifically, for pointer comparisons, section 5.9 "Relational Operators" of the C++ standard says:

If two pointers p and q of the same type point to different objects that are not members of the same object or to different functions or if only one of them is null, the results of p<q, p>q, p<=q and p>=q are unspecified.

Note that the behaviour is unspecified (meaning that the result of the comparison could be true or false - in other words the result doesn't tell you anything useful - but the implementation isn't required to specify which) as opposed to undefined (meaning that the compiler or the resulting program could do anything at all).

However, so far I have only seen one family of implementations that didn't do the expected thing with code like Kirill's:

bool inside = (other_pointer >= array) && (other_pointer < array+size);

Those implementations are compilers intended for building MS-DOS real-mode programs, in which addresses have a paragraph and offset part. The addresses FF00:0010 and FF01:0000 point to the same memory location but if I recall correctly the compilers weren't guaranteed to behave in the expected way, except when compiling for some memory models (certainly the HUGE model but perhaps others).

However, if either p or q does not point to an existing object (because for example the pointer was freed) then the behaviour is going to be undefined no matter what you do. So you can't use this kind of method to figure out if a pointer is still valid.

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1  
FF00:0000 translates to FF00*10+0000=FF000, while FF001:0010 would have translated, if it had been a correct pointer like FF01:0010, to FF01*10+0010=FF020. Check the math. –  Alexey Frunze Jun 22 '12 at 22:40
    
Ah I was wrong. It's merely unspecified. Thanks. –  zounds Jun 22 '12 at 22:41
    
Thanks for the correction Alex. –  James Youngman Jun 22 '12 at 22:42

Arrays are guaranteed to be contiguous in memory, so just check that the pointer is within the bounds of the address of the first element and the last.

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1  
It should also be checked that the difference between the pointer and the address of the array is a multiple of sizeof(someType). –  Alexey Frunze Jun 22 '12 at 22:21
3  
@Alex: Actually, I disagree. As R. Martinho Fernandes says, that would be an invalid pointer anyway. –  Ed S. Jun 22 '12 at 22:24
    
You don't want the function to return true for an invalid pointer. –  Alexey Frunze Jun 22 '12 at 22:27
2  
@Alex: I don't think it's any better to return false. Why do you have an invalid pointer in the first place? I'd say undefined behavior, I'm not even going to specify what happens. What functions are you aware of that specify their behavior when passed an invalid pointer? –  Ed S. Jun 22 '12 at 22:29
1  
In most practical implementations of C and C++ the magic UB isn't all that magic, pointers are just numbers that the CPU uses as addresses. If you're writing something like kernel system call functions, you really really want to check things like this, regardless of whether or not the language standard tells you it's been UB already or there will be UB. –  Alexey Frunze Jun 22 '12 at 22:44
bool is_inside(someType * array, int size, someType * other_pointer) {
  return array <= other_pointer && other_pointer < array + size;
}
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Beware of overflows in addition and subtraction. And it should also be checked that the difference between the pointer and the address of the array is a multiple of sizeof(someType). –  Alexey Frunze Jun 22 '12 at 22:24
1  
@Alex: There can be no overflow in the above code if array is really an array and size is it's size. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 22 '12 at 22:40
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas True. –  Alexey Frunze Jun 22 '12 at 22:45
1  
More seriously, if other_pointer does not point to an element of the array then the results of the comparison operators are unspecified. –  Charles Bailey Jun 22 '12 at 22:50

You can simply write:

bool inside = (other_pointer >= array) && (other_pointer < array+size);

This is legal check.

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1  
It should also be checked that the difference between the pointer and the address of the array is a multiple of sizeof(someType). –  Alexey Frunze Jun 22 '12 at 22:22
1  
Also, beware of overflows in addition and subtraction. –  Alexey Frunze Jun 22 '12 at 22:22
4  
@Alex "If both the pointer operand and the result point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object, the evaluation shall not produce an overflow; otherwise, the behavior is undefined." from §5.7/6. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 22 '12 at 22:28
2  
Assuming an incorrect size was given, the only sensible implementation of that function would be std::terminate(). There's nothing you can do. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 22 '12 at 22:33
3  
@JonathanWakely: I believe that std::less for pointers is only guaranteed to be a suitable order for use in sets, etc. It isn't guaranteed to be suitable for determining whether and object is an element of an array. Arrays could appear interleaved. –  Charles Bailey Jun 22 '12 at 22:35

Your solution will work but is not optimal as it contains an unnecessary loop.

What you should do, is to take a pointer to the array, the array size in bytes, and check if the pointed address falls within the address space occupied by that array.

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1  
It should also be checked that the difference between the pointer and the address of the array is a multiple of sizeof(someType). –  Alexey Frunze Jun 22 '12 at 22:21
2  
The element size is unnecessary (hint: it's given by the mention of someType in the arguments). –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 22 '12 at 22:22
1  
@Alex That is only the case where the array itself starts from an address which is a multiple of sizeof(someType). –  zxcdw Jun 22 '12 at 22:27
    
Pointing into the "middle" of an array element isn't a good thing irrespective of where the array starts. –  Alexey Frunze Jun 22 '12 at 22:29
1  
@zxcdw: No. You should not care about invalid pointers (nor could you do anything sensible in the face of them). If you are passed an invalid pointer then the behavior is already undefined as you had to invoke UB to get the invalid pointer in the first place –  Ed S. Jun 22 '12 at 22:34

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