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I have a button that I want to make disappear if anything is tapped other than the button. So I set the target:action: for the delete button:

[self.deleteButton addTarget:self action:@selector(deleteButtonTapped:) forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];

followed later by adding the tap gesture recognizer to the containing view:

[self.superview addGestureRecognizer:self.tapOutsideDelete];

When I do this, the action for deleteButton is not executed, as if the button tap is not recognized. The gesture recognizer does work in this case. But it also works when I tap deleteButton, which leads me to think that the tap gesture recognizer has priority over the button tap.

If I remove the gesture recognizer, deleteButton works correctly.

I clearly don't understand how to handle these two events together. What do I need to do?

(deleteButton is mimicking the delete button of a table view cell, but in this case I have it in a header view. I expect to call a method to make the delete button to disappear when I tap anywhere in the table except the button itself, the same way it works in a cell.)

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You may get a bit of weirdness adding the gesture recognizer to self.superview instead of self (or self.view if it's a view controller). This would add it to the tableview which contains the header view, rather than to the header view, which may or may not be what you intend. –  MusiGenesis Jun 22 '12 at 22:43
    
possible duplicate of Gesture recognizer and button actions –  Simon Goldeen Apr 3 '13 at 0:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Yes, the tap gesture gets first crack at the tap. You need to implement the gestureRecognizer:shouldReceiveTouch: method:

- (BOOL)gestureRecognizer:(UIGestureRecognizer *)gestureRecognizer 
            shouldReceiveTouch:(UITouch *)touch {

    if (touch.view == self.deleteButton) {
        return NO;
    }
    return YES;
}
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2  
Thanks. This worked perfectly. It took a little digging to discover that this is a delegate method of the UIGestureRecognizerDelegate protocol, so the delegate pointer must also be set. –  Jim Jun 22 '12 at 23:32
    
@Jim: sorry, I was going to add that. It's frustrating how so many iOS tutorials etc. on the web don't contain all the information you need for a solution, and I just added to it. –  MusiGenesis Jun 23 '12 at 0:04

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