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I have read through the follow SO articles

All seem very close to my question and have good answers, but they do not seem to answer my question other than to say that I need to make the method non-static.

an example:

abstract public class baseClass
{
    private static List<string> attributeNames = new List(new string {"property1","property2"});
    // code for property definition and access
    virtual public static bool ValidAttribtue(string attributeName)
    {
        if (attributeNames.Contains(attributeName))
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }
}
class derivedA : baseClass
{
    private static List<string> attributeNames = new List(new string {"property3","property4"});
    // code for property definition and access
    public static override bool ValidAttribute(string attributeName)
    {
        if (attributeNames.Contains(attributeName))
        {
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            return base.ValidAttribute(attributeName);
        }
    }
}
class derivedB : baseClass
{
    private static List<string> attributeNames = new List(new string {"property10","property11"});
    // code for property definition and access
    public static override bool ValidAttribute(string attributeName)
    {
        if (attributeNames.Contains(attributeName))
        {
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            return base.ValidAttribute(attributeName);
        }
    }
}

derivedA would have properties 1,2,3,4 while derivedB would have properties 1,2,10,11. The list of properties seems to be a class specific value and can not be changed at any point. I would think it then would be static.

Is my design wrong in the sense that I am trying to use static methods when they should not be?

The above example makes me think that inheritance of static methods would be needed, yet it seems that trying to do this is a design flaw. Can anyone help me to understand what is wrong with coding or structuring classes in this manner?

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Is this actual code? You can't have virtual static members. –  Chris Sinclair Jun 22 '12 at 22:43
    
No it is just example code of an operation that I was thinking should be possible. –  John Groman Jun 22 '12 at 22:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Is my design wrong in the sense that I am trying to use static methods when they should not be?

Yes. Aside from anything else, you're trying to declare a static method as virtual (and then override it), which isn't allowed. You're also trying to declare a class called base, when that's a keyword.

Static methods simply aren't polymorphic. The basis of polymorphism is that the execution time type of the instance involved can be different to the compile-time type of the expression, and the implementation is chosen on the basis of the execution time type. That concept doesn't make sense for static methods as there is no instance.

Now of course you can make a static method in a derived class call a static method in the base class - but there won't be any polymorphism anywhere.

As a side note, all of your methods could be written in a more readable way:

// Base class implementation
return attributeNames.Contains(attributeName);

// Derived class implementations
return attributeNames.Contains(attributeName) ||
       BaseClass.ValidAttribute(attributeName);
share|improve this answer
    
To make sure I am understanding this correctly, the abstract class defines the operation that all derived classes will have. The derived classes need the functionality that is there. The checking does not change ever and is completely defined at compile time. The presence or absence of a property is known at compile time. The checking needs to change per class but should be able to take advantage of the base classes function. This building on each other is not a static mechanism but instead a polymorphism mechanism? –  John Groman Jun 22 '12 at 22:52
    
@JohnGroman: If you don't need polymorphism - i.e. calling on the "right" implementation at execution time based on the type of an instance - then you can do this without polymorphism. I would strongly advise you to give the methods different names to make it clearer that there really isn't any polymorphism going on, but it will work, in terms of a derived class's static method calling a base class's static method. It's just another static method, as far as the language is concerned - there's no relationship between the two. –  Jon Skeet Jun 22 '12 at 22:54
    
Thanks for the answers and comments I guess I need to read up more on polymorphism. Also thanks for the more readable form –  John Groman Jun 22 '12 at 22:59

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