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I'm trying to update a table from a form.

I have 3 pages. The first one queries all of the rows from my table with an "edit" link. When edit is clicked (page 2) the code pulls the $id and puts it in the url. The $id is pulled from the url and is used in a query to fill a form.

My problem is passing the updated form info to my table. Basically the update isn't happening.

Second page

<?php

  include '../db/config.php';
  include '../db/opendb.php';

$id = $_GET["id"]; 

  $order = "SELECT * FROM tableName where id='$id'";
  $result = mysql_query($order);
  $row = mysql_fetch_array($result);

  ?>

  <form method="post" action="edit_data.php">
  <input type="hidden" name="id" value="<?php echo "$row[id]"?>">
    <tr>        
      <td>Title</td>
<td>
<input type="text" name="title" size="20" value="<?php echo"$row[title]"?>">
</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Post</td>
    <td>
<input type="text" name="post" size="40" value="<?php echo
  "$row[post]"?>">
</td></tr>
<tr>
<td align="right">
<input type="submit" name="submit value" value="Edit">
</td>
    </tr>
</form>

* fixed third page

                   include '../db/config.php';
      include '../db/opendb.php';

if (isset($_POST[id])){
$id = mysql_real_escape_string(trim($_POST['id']));
    }else{
$id = NULL;
    }

if (isset($_POST[title])){
$title = mysql_real_escape_string(trim($_POST['title']));
    }else{
$title = NULL;
    }

if (isset($_POST[post])){
$post = mysql_real_escape_string(trim($_POST['post']));
    }else{
$post = NULL;
    }

$query = "UPDATE tableName SET title='$title', post='$post' WHERE id='$id'";           
mysql_query($query); 

?>

thanks in advance : )

*edit thanks everyone

share|improve this question
    
Troubleshoot the query functioning with a database UI like phpMyAdmin. –  Smandoli Jun 22 '12 at 22:47
1  
Please note that the community is moving towards using PDO: php.net/manual/en/book.pdo.php Using this is not only easy but will save you from sql injection attacks! –  Nathaniel Ford Jun 22 '12 at 22:47
    
What error message are you seeing? –  relentless Jun 22 '12 at 22:48
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5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted
if (isset($_POST[title])){
$title = mysql_real_escape_string(trim($_POST['title']));
    }else{
$title = NULL;
    }

if (isset($_POST[post])){
$post = mysql_real_escape_string(trim($_POST['post']));
    }else{
$post = NULL;
    }


$query = "UPDATE tableName SET title='$title', post='$post' WHERE id='$id'";           
mysql_query($query); 

I would also recommend mysqli functions instead of mysql and I probably wouldn't call a variable and table column 'post' to avoid confusion.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much I also had to pass id to the 3rd page also with the if (isset($_POST[id])){ $id = mysql_real_escape_string(trim($_POST['id'])); }else{ $id = NULL; } –  hobbywebsite Jun 22 '12 at 23:05
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It should be

UPDATE tableName SET `title` = {$_POST['title']}, `post` = {$_POST['post']}...

Ask yourself, what are you setting?

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2  
I also think you need to surround the $_POST with {} aswell, I don't think the string gets formatted correctly otherwise. –  dotty Jun 22 '12 at 22:51
    
Thanks, updated my response. –  sachleen Jun 22 '12 at 23:00
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Your SQL statement for the database update is wrong. It should include a listing of not only the new values but also the corresponding field names. This means it should look more like this:

$query = "UPDATE tableName SET `title` = {$_POST['title']}, `post` = {$_POST['post']} WHERE id = '$id'";

Notice that you also should embrace fields of $_POST inside of strings with curly brackets ({}) or put them outside of the quotes. (like " = " .$_POST['title']. ", "). This is absolutely necessary if you use the standard way to access those with he quotes (e.g. not $_POST[title] but $_POST['title'] or $_POST["title"]).

Additionally you should add the following to your code:

  • Some error handling, currently you don't even know if something went wrong. The simplest way is to check the return value of the mysql_query() function for null and if it is null, get the mysql error message with mysql_error().
  • Escaping for passed values. Currently you directly pass the posted data into a mysql query which is very insecure. (See for example SQL-Injection on wikipedia) You should use mysql_real_escape_string() on all form data before inserting them into queries. This escapes all parts that could be malicious.
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That is because you are not setting the values. In the statement:

$query = "UPDATE tableName SET '$_POST[title]', '$post[post]' WHERE id='$id'";

you should pass column names to be updated.

share|improve this answer
1  
$query="Update tableName (title, post) WHERE id='$id'" VALUES ('$_POST[title]','$_POST[post]')"; –  hobbywebsite Jun 22 '12 at 22:53
    
@hobbywebsite do remember to use mysql_real_escape_string() –  hjpotter92 Jun 22 '12 at 22:55
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If you are not using PDO statements yet to prevent SQL injection attacks then you should use more protection then just mysql_real_escape_string(). On top of escaping the data you should be validating that the submitted data is in fact what you are expecting.

Ie. In your code here:

  $id = $_GET["id"]; 

  $order = "SELECT * FROM tableName where id='$id'";
  $result = mysql_query($order);
  $row = mysql_fetch_array($result);

If you added:

if(is_numeric($_GET['id'])){
   $id = mysql_real_escape_string(trim($_GET["id"]));

   $order = "SELECT id, title, post FROM tableName where id='$id'";
   $result = mysql_query($order);
   $row = mysql_fetch_array($result);
  }

This would at least validate what you are executing is in fact an ID number (That is, if ID is actually a number ;) . You can apply this logic to all your inputs if you are not yet using PDO statements. If you are expecting letters then validate for letters, numbers validate for numbers, escape special characters. Again, this is bare minimum. I would really suggest reading up on the hundreds of SQL injection techniques and start reading up on PDO's.

Also, in regards to using the SELECT * statement. I would try and avoid it. It adds a layer of vulnerability to your statements, if you change the order of the fields in your table and you are using $row[0] (Numbered requests) it can muck things up and lastly if your table contains additional fields with data that is unrelated to the ones you need then you are using on this page then you are loading information you don't need to.

 $order = "SELECT id, title, post FROM tableName where id='$id'";

Would solve that nicely. :) Good luck!

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